Washington DC Suboxone Doctors


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Washington DC has not been exempt from the national opioid addiction dilemma. Similar to other large metropolitan cities in the United States, Washington has seen a steady rise in opiate addiction. A surprising extent of this is directly related to the abundance of prescription painkillers commonly provided, and perhaps even over-prescribed, by certain factions of the medical community. Washington offers a notable number of qualified doctors who are authorized to write prescriptions for suboxone. Suboxone (containing the opiate agonist buprenorphine) is a reputable treatment option for helping to eliminate opiate withdrawal symptoms for many addicted individuals. If you are a local doctor aiming to treat Washington DC area residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.



Washington DC Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Richard Bruce Ashby, M.D. 1647 Benning Road NE
Suite 301
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 398-2100
Charles Hall, M.D. 1647 Benning Road N.E.
Suite 200
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 255-3975
Edwin C. Chapman, M.D. 1647 Benning Road NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 396-8550
Walter L. Faggett II, M.D. 825 North Capitol Street, NE
Suite 5135
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 442-9077
Anthony Flood, M.D. 650 Pennsylvania Avenue SE
Washington, DC 20003
(202) 547-9090
Fidelis F. Doh, M.D. 1900 Massachusetts Avenue SE
Suite 1242
Washington, DC 20003
(202) 548-6500
Christopher G. Santangelo, M.D. GWU Hospital 3800 Reservoir Road NW
611 Kobes-Cogan Boulevard
Washington, DC 20007
(202) 687-6655
Mary Rachel Lee, M.D. 4501 Albemarle Street, N.W.
Suite 217
Washington, DC 20008
(202) 686-9171
Burton G. Schonfeld, M.D. 3000 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20008
(202) 363-7755
Christopher John Spevak, M.D. Georgetown University Hospital
3800 Reservoir Road
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 444-2090
David T. Ault, M.D. 1800 R Street NW
Suite C-9
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 986-0371
Yavar Moghimi, M.D. 1701 14th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 745-7000
Ni Ni Khin, M.D. 3020 14 th Street NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 518-6419
Robert J. Ball, M.D. 106 Irving Street, NW, Suite S406
Washington Hospital Center – POB South
Washington, DC 20010
(202) 877-0535
Robert Keisling, M.D. 110 Irving Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20010
(202) 877-5343
Dennis Scurry, Jr., M.D. 6323 Georgia Avenue, NW
Unit 208
Washington, DC 20011
(202) 291-0124
Ricardo Galbis, M.D. Andromeda Transcultural Health
1400 Decatur Street NW
Washington, DC 20011
(202) 291-4707
Ikechi C. Nnawuchi, M.D. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Suite 950
Washington, DC 20015
(202) 570-4590
Alen Salerian, M.D. 5255 Wisconsin Avenue
Suite 104
Washington, DC 20015
(202) 244-9000
Celia Rejino Oliveira, M.D. 3301 New Mexico Avenue, NW
Unit 345
Washington, DC 20016
(202) 537-3833
Philip Alan Seibel, M.D. 4545 42 Street, NW
Unit 204
Washington, DC 20016
(202) 686-1870
Ted Alan Ramsey, M.D. 4545 42nd Street, NW
Suite 204
Washington, DC 20016
(240) 997-1824
David H. Fram, M.D. 4545 42nd Street, NW
Washington, DC 20016
(202) 686-1870
John F. Dombrowski, M.D. 3301 New Mexico Avenue, NW
Unit 346
Washington, DC 20016
(202) 362-4787
Okay Harold Odocha, M.D. 1140 Varnum Street, NE
Suite #102
Washington, DC 20017
(202) 526-7091
Homaira Ahad-Amiri, M.D. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
1053 Buchannan Street, NE
Washington, DC 20017
(202) 269-7222
Robert J. Ball, M.D. Elaine Ellis Center of Health
1605 Kenilworth Avenue, NE
Washington, DC 20019
(202) 803-2340
Michele Rene Arthurs, M.D. 1638 Good Hope Road
Washington, DC 20020
(202) 610-7280
Ilse R. Levin, D.O. 1500 Galen Street, SE
Washington, DC 20020
(202) 610-7160×1026
Andrew Christopher Robie, M.D. 1500 Galen Street, SE
Washington, DC 20020
(202) 610-7186
Veronica Jenkins, M.D. 2041 Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20020
(202) 889-7900
Seth McGregor Garber, M.D. Unity Healthcare Southwest Health Center
850 Delaware Ave SW
Washington, DC 20024
(202) 548-4520
Osamede Edokpolo, M.D. 1100 Alabama Avenue SE
Washington, DC 20032
(202) 642-0303
Tyler G. Jones, M.D. Saint Elizabeths Hospital
1100 Alabama Avenue SE
Washington, DC 20032
(202) 299-5199
Gavin Elliot Rose, M.D. 2700 Martin Luther King Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20032
(202) 645-4933
Lynsey Proctor Tamborello, M.D. 1010 25th Street NW
Apartment 701
Washington, DC 20037
(713) 855-9071
Louis Theodore Joseph, M.D. 2150 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
8th Floor
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 741-2900
John R. Maloney, M.D. 2141 K Street, NW
Suite 304
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 496-9700
Megan Lynn Dankovich, M.D. 3 Washington Circle, NW
Suite 403
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 604-0358
Joseph Jeral, M.D. 2440 M Street, NW
Suite 720
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 457-8899
Paul Alexander Van Ravenswaay, M.D. 908 New Hampshire Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 536-4410
Mohan T. Advani, M.D. 2300 M. Street, NW, #832
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 973-2838
Steven Howard Lipsius, M.D. 2141 K Street NW, Suite 404
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 223-1765
Julia B. Frank, M.D. 2120 L Street, NW
Suite 600
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 741-2900


Opioid Treatment Program Rules

Methadone programs and doctors who prescribe buprenorphine serve a very important function in helping the country cope with the opioid crisis. They are also a life-saving link for patients who have suffered for years with an overwhelming addiction.

Operating a methadone clinic or buprenorphine/suboxone practice is typically a complex endeavor. Clinics that offer medication-assisted treatment (MAT) must comply with a myriad of mandates and policy requirements from the DEA, the local State Methadone Authority, accreditation organizations like CARF and JCAH, SAMHSA (the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration}, and 3rd party payers who help fund treatment services.

Patients understand that a well-run treatment clinic offers many benefits. Quality services are only delivered when there is an organizational commitment to helping people while also being able to meet all of the operational requirements such as timely documentation of services (paperwork) and appropriate support of staff & counselors,

Sometimes patients will complain about “so many clinic rules” although many patients appreciate their clinic’s dedication to professionalism and its ability to meet the standards of good quality care. Within most treatment facilities are several key staff who oversee its daily operation and the provision of services. These are the Clinical Director, the Medical Director or primary prescribing physician, the Nurse Supervisor, and possibly clinical staff Team Leaders who do the work of coordinating the clinics many daily activities.

While the list of clinic rules can seem long, there is nearly always an important underlying reason for that rule to exist. Most methadone clinics distribute a Handbook for clients that outlines their rights as an opioid treatment patient as well as guidelines for obtaining dosage adjustments and progressing successfully through treatment.

Opioid treatment, and medication-assistance in particular, must be carefully monitored. This is to insure patient safety and to minimize the risk of medication errors. Please support your local methadone or suboxone clinic with words of encouragement and positive feedback when it is earned. Conversely, it is important to speak up as well if serious problems are occurring. Always make an effort to communicate first with the clinic’s clinical and administrative staff if experiencing a problem. If an honest effort to resolve an issue in this manner is not productive, then contacting one’s local State Methadone Authority is sometimes a logical next step for addressing an important concern.

Posted in Buprenorphine, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Programs, Methadone Treatment, Recovery, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Opioid Treatment Program Rules

Ohio Town Hall on Opioid Addiction

Several organizations in Ohio recently hosted a town hall discussion on the opioid crisis still occurring there and across the country. News commentator, Eric Bolling, was a moderator of the event which was held at Cedarville University.

Eric and his wife, Adrienne, lost their 19 year old son in 2017 due to an accidental overdose with the powerful opioid, fentanyl.

This town hall discussion was designed to continue raising public awareness on the danger of opioid misuse and the continuing need for treatment and recovery support services to help families deal with this perpetual problem.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report that there were 70,237 drug overdoses in 2017 with 47,600 involving opioids specifically. The article linked above states that the state of Ohio ranked 2nd in overdose deaths only behind West Virginia.

There is promising news in that more Americans are now being educated on opioid risks, and consequently are taking better precautions as well as actively accessing methadone & suboxone programs offering helpful medication-assistance and behavioral counseling. Saving lives and offering recovery are messages that are being heard.

Posted in Buprenorphine, Fentanyl, Heroin Overdose, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opioid Addiction, Recovery, Suboxone | Tagged , | Comments Off on Ohio Town Hall on Opioid Addiction

Youth and Opioid Addiction

In past decades, opioid addiction was skewed more heavily toward an older generation of adults. But today we have larger numbers of youth using opioids and experiencing addiction-related problems at earlier ages. Importantly, research has demonstrated conclusively that those who remain engaged in treatment for six months or more are much more likely to stabilize and to enjoy sustained success with recovery.

A recent Reuters Health article highlights the fact that many opioid-addicted youth are either not yet engaging in treatment or are exiting treatment too early. While more youth are being saved through the overdose reversal drug naloxone, a majority of addicted youth are still not receiving medicated-assisted treatments such as buprenorphine or methadone.

More work is necessary to open up treatment avenues for young adults across America, and to both educate & compel youth to seek MAT (medication-assisted treatment) as soon as possible.

The opioid addiction problem in America will not soon disappear. Drugs continue to find their way across the U.S. border through multiple avenues. Positive efforts are indeed bringing needed change, but the complexity and extent of opioid addiction in the U.S. will require a long-term, sustained commitment throughout the country. We must get the message out – especially to young people who may not fully grasp the power of addiction!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Heroin, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Addiction, Opioid Addiction, Recovery, Rehab For Teens, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Youth and Opioid Addiction

Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

Opioid Use Disorder is the newer clinical terminology (from the DSM5) used to describe the full range of opioid problems ranging from mild opioid-related use issues to severe opioid addiction.

The CDC reports that in 2017 there were 72,287 deaths from overdose in the United States. That is certainly an alarming statistic. Of that number, 49,060 of those deaths were from opioids specifically – just in 2017. By contrast, there were 58,200 U.S. fatalities that resulted from the entire Vietnam war.

The good news is that government funding for opioid treatment is finally entering the stream on a local level. Increasing numbers of methadone clinics and physicians authorized to prescribe buprenorphine are moving into America’s more rural areas, ones that have historically been severely underserved.

As treatment for Opioid Use Disorder becomes more readily available, people struggling under the constant pressure of addiction will have an opportunity to apply the brake, and to veer onto a new path of stability and recovery. That being said, it is estimated that presently only 1 person of 10 with an opioid use disorder has sought treatment. For many opioid addicted people, treatment made the difference between life and death.

Choose a new path is more than words for those that have truly done so. Addiction is a highly persistent disease, but change is possible. Commitment and action are the necessary ingredients in opening the door to a new life. Opioid Use Disorder, in particular, is successfully treated with medication assistance. Science, research, and life experience have fortunately reinforced this fact with perfect clarity. Please find a local treatment provider today!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality