Charleston Suboxone Doctors


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Charleston offers South Carolina residents a range of treatment options for those facing chronic opioid withdrawal symptoms. Prescription opioids are developing into a serious problem with more people having an addiction to them than heroin. With the recent jump in opiate addiction over the last 10 years, suboxone has become increasingly sought as a primary treatment intervention to assist those trying to cope with persistent opioid withdrawal symptoms. Charleston offers a notable list of authorized doctors approved to write prescriptions for suboxone. Buprenorphine is the key ingredient in suboxone that alleviates withdrawal symptoms by binding to the brain’s opiate receptor sites. Suboxone is widely available across the country based on its effective track record in eliminating opioid withdrawal, and it has gained in popularity given its proven effectiveness. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Charleston residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.



Charleston Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Stephen Kenneth Baker, M.D. 114 Ashley Avenue
Charleston, SC 29401
(843) 577-7424
John E. Emmel, M.D. Charleston Center
5 Charleston Center Drive
Charleston, SC 29401
(843) 958-3335
Tara M. Wright, M.D. Ralph H. Johnson VAMC, Mental Health
109 Bee Street
Charleston, SC 29401
(843) 789-7108
Jeffrey S. Cluver, M.D. 109 Bee Street
Charleston, SC 29401
(843) 789-7311
Robert Clifton Glenn, M.D. 1483 Tobias Gadsden Boulevard
Unit #107
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 745-5153
Calvin Johnathan Bosman, M.D. 4 Carriage Lane
Suite 300-C
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 509-2608
Darlene H. Moak, M.D. St. Andrews Psychiatric Services
669 St. Andrews Boulevard
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 367-2716
Constance Alexander, M.D. Barrier Island Psychiatry
1954 Ashley River Road, Suite H
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 556-8177
Jeffrey W. Buncher, M.D. 1124 Sam Rattenburg Boulevard
Suite I
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 556-3462
Allan A. Rashford, M.D. 2049 Savannah Highway
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 722-2107
Sarah Weiss Book, M.D. Center for Drug and Alcohol Programs
29 Leinbach Drive, Building C, Unit 2&3
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 792-5200
Todd K. Magro, M.D. 1620 Ashley River Road
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 556-8177
Douglas Michael Burgess, M.D. MUSC Institute of Psychiatry
29 Leinbach Drive; Building C, Unit 2&3
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 792-9888
Ralph Bernard Piening III, M.D. 1124 Sam Rittenberg Boulevard
Suite 1
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 556-3462
Temeia Denise Martin, M.D. 1721 Ashley Hall Road
Unit 5-R
Charleston, SC 29407
(703) 380-0578
Eduardo Cifuentes, M.D. 1483 Tobias Gadson Boulevard
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 576-6750
Tresha Taylor Ward, M.D. Ashley River Family Physicians
2270 Ashley Crossing Drive Suite 165
Charleston, SC 29414
(843) 763-9472
Antonio Medalla Hernandez, M.D. 2125 Charlie Hall Boulevard
Suite A
Charleston, SC 29414
(843) 876-3051
Heather Rose Dawson, M.D. 6518-B Dorchester Road
Charleston, SC 29418
(843) 767-3323
Nicole Stocking, M.D. 67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-2300
Carlotta J. Lalich, M.D. 67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-2300
Anoren Huchingson, M.D. MUSC
67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-2123
Bryant Byrne, M.D. 67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-2123
Thomas Brouette, M.D. MUSC
67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-1414
Robert James Malcolm, Jr., M.D. 4-N CDAP Psychiatry, M.U.S.C.
67 President Street, Rm 459
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-5200
Bryan Tolliver, M.D., Ph.D. Medical University of South Carolina
67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-5200
Terri Lamarr Randall, M .D. 171 Ashley Avenue
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-2123
Kelly S. Barth, D.O. 67 President Street
PO Box 250861
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-9888
Joseph Gulino, M.D. 67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-0037
Zach Stroud, M.D. MUSC
67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-2123
Jason Rocco Molinaro, M.D. 67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-2123×15758
Jennifer Patterson, M.D. 67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-2123
David R. Beckert, M.D. 67 President Street
Msc 861
Charleston, SC 29425
(843) 792-0192
Emily Maria Rountree, M.D. 67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
(704) 301-0998


Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

Opioid Use Disorder is the newer clinical terminology (from the DSM5) used to describe the full range of opioid problems ranging from mild opioid-related use issues to severe opioid addiction.

The CDC reports that in 2017 there were 72,287 deaths from overdose in the United States. That is certainly an alarming statistic. Of that number, 49,060 of those deaths were from opioids specifically – just in 2017. By contrast, there were 58,200 U.S. fatalities that resulted from the entire Vietnam war.

The good news is that government funding for opioid treatment is finally entering the stream on a local level. Increasing numbers of methadone clinics and physicians authorized to prescribe buprenorphine are moving into America’s more rural areas, ones that have historically been severely underserved.

As treatment for Opioid Use Disorder becomes more readily available, people struggling under the constant pressure of addiction will have an opportunity to apply the brake, and to veer onto a new path of stability and recovery. That being said, it is estimated that presently only 1 person of 10 with an opioid use disorder has sought treatment. For many opioid addicted people, treatment made the difference between life and death.

Choose a new path is more than words for those that have truly done so. Addiction is a highly persistent disease, but change is possible. Commitment and action are the necessary ingredients in opening the door to a new life. Opioid Use Disorder, in particular, is successfully treated with medication assistance. Science, research, and life experience have fortunately reinforced this fact with perfect clarity. Please find a local treatment provider today!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

A Presidential briefing on March 19, 2018 in Manchester, NH was used to announce that ADAPT Pharma has volunteered to provide, for free, the life-saving medication NARCAN® to all U.S. high schools, colleges and universities.

NARCAN® is a name brand overdose antidote (based on naloxone) that restores breathing and consciousness in opioid overdose victims typically within five minutes.

ADAPT Pharma offers a 40% discount off wholesale pricing on the Narcan nasal spray to Law Enforcement agencies and Firefighters as well as non-profit community based organizations.

Seamus Mulligan, CEO of ADAPT, commented in a company press release that ADAPT is committed to raising awareness of opioid overdose risks and distributing NARCAN® widely so that it will be available to bystanders and emergency personnel who can offer immediate help in the event of a crisis.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Methadone, Naloxone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

What Is Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an opioid treatment medication that works very differently than either methadone or buprenorphine.

Naltrexone functions as an opioid blocker that interferes with the euphoric effects of opiates. Unlike methadone, naltrexone does not eliminate opioid withdrawal. So it is typically only begun following a successful period of opioid detoxification.

Naltrexone is taken as a pill or as a time-released injectable. It blocks the feeling of getting high thus deterring a person from continuing in active drug use with opioids. If there’s no pay off for using, why do it?

Some individuals who don’t necessarily require methadone or buprenorphine can effectively utilize naltrexone as a component of their recovery program. Vivitrol is the time-released, branded version of naltrexone that is taken once monthly as an injection. With Vivitrol, the naltrexone remains active in the bloodstream for 30 days and blocks the effects of heroin or other opiate use. This reinforces one’s focus on recovery choices and can reduce opioid cravings.

Patients receiving naltrexone may develop a lowered tolerance to opioids over time, and should remain aware of the risk of opioid overdose should they relapse. The medication is also used in the treatment of alcohol dependency and has been shown to reduce the euphoric effects of alcohol consumption.

Naltrexone is not to be confused with Naloxone. Naloxone is the opioid overdose reversal medication that has recently been in the news for saving thousands of lives across the country.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Drug Treatment, Methadone Clinics, Naltrexone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Vivitrol | Comments Off on What Is Naltrexone

Billions To Be Allocated In Fight Against Opioid Crisis

The national budget proposal for the 2019 fiscal year includes a request for $13 billion in funding for opioid treatment and related services. This linked Newsweek article states that $3 billion would be allocated in 2018 and another $10 billion in 2019.

Many opioid treatment programs across the country are currently able to add patient slots when additional funding is made available. The opioid crisis has flooded many clinics that are already at maximum census due to limited State and Medicaid funding.

A number of private pay clinics have opened in recent years as the need for medication-assisted treatment increased. If a substantial allocation of government funds becomes available, opioid treatment services will finally come into sharp national focus as scores of people finally obtain the help they need to stabilize and to recover.

In treating opioid addiction, research has shown that traditional abstinence-based programs which do not utilize medication assistance have a failure rate of 90%. Medication-assistance is a critical factor in helping opioid addicted people move into sustained recovery. The proposed $13 billion earmarked for opioid treatment services can make a huge difference all across the U.S. Methadone or buprenorphine (suboxone) coupled with counseling and drug testing comprise the gold standard of care in treating opioid addiction.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Buprenorphine, Drug Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Benefits, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone News, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors | Comments Off on Billions To Be Allocated In Fight Against Opioid Crisis