Seattle Suboxone Doctors


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Seattle provides a number of area physicians approved to prescribe suboxone for relief from moderate opiate addiction withdrawal. Opiate addiction eventually causes uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms which interfere with daily life and which disable one from meeting normal functions & responsibilities. Buprenorphine is the opioid agonist in Suboxone medication that reduces withdrawal by binding to the body’s opiate receptor sites. Fortunately, Suboxone has become more available in recent years and is now commonly regarded as a “best practice” treatment for mild to moderate opiate dependence. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Seattle area residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.



Seattle Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Lindy Sue Griffin, D.O. 509 Olive Way
Suite 1664
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 623-7940
Gary D. Carr, M.D. 720 Olive Way
Suite 1010
Seattle, WA 98101-1819
(206) 583-0127
Gregory David Rudolf, M.D. 1101 Madison Street
Suite 200
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 386-2013
Rajni K. Jutla, M.D. 6900 East Greenlake Way North
Suite J
Seattle, WA 98103
(425) 744-2300
Amanda Kost, M.D. 325 Ninth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 520-5000
Denise R. Pounds, M.D. 1401 Madison
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 386-6054
Bruce Davin Larson, M.D. 1101 Madison Street
Suite 1260
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 622-5454
Richard K. Ries, M.D. 325 9th Avenue
Box 359911
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 341-4226
Christine E. Yuodelis-Flores, M.D. Harborview Medical Center
325 9th Avenue, Box 359797
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 744-9600
Joseph O. Merrill, M.D. Harborview Medical Center
325 Ninth Ave – Box 359780
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 744-1834
August Thomas Piper, M.D. 901 Boren Avenue
Suite 1010
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 623-5757
Brian F. Smart, M.D. Box 359911
325 Ninth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 744-4727
Angela Yue, M.D. Roosevelt Family Medical Center
4245 Roosevelt Way, NE
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 598-4055
Ray Hsiao, M.D. 4800 Sand Point Way NE
P.O. Box 5371, M/S W3636
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 987-3287
Judith Pauwels, M.D. 4245 Roosevelt Way, NE
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 598-4055
Eddie Anthony Espanol III, M.D. Swedish Medical Center – Ballard Campus
5300 Tallman Avenue NW
Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 781-6209
James M. Squire, M.D. 1801 NW Market Street
Suite 107
Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 465-6340
Vania Petkova Rudolf, M.D. Swedish Ballard
5300 Tallman Avenue, NW
Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 781-6209
Thomas John Deal, M.D. 1801 NW Market Street
Suite 107
Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 789-5555
Jacqueline Y. Wong 5300 Tallman Avenue, NW
Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 781-6209
Shabnam Balali, M.D. 1660 South Columbian Way
Mail stop: S-116- DDTP
Seattle, WA 98108
(818) 912-9699
Charles Wesley Meredith ATC S-116
1660 South Columbian Way
Seattle, WA 98108
(206) 340-3537
Timothy Charles Dawson, M.D. 1660 South Columbian Way
Mail-stop: S-00-C&PO
Seattle, WA 98108
(206) 716-5900
Tushar Kumar, M.D. 1505 Westlake Avenue North
Suite 920
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 386-3103
Jennifer Velander, M.D. 1505 Westlake Avenue North
Suite 920
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 386-3103
Michael Robert Oreskovich, M.D. 1505 Westlake Avenue North
Suite 920
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 386-3103
Michael Rosenfield, D.O. Emerald City Medical Arts
16 Roy Street
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 281-1616
Steven M. Rudnick, M.D. 6300 Sand Point Way
Unit #210
Seattle, WA 98115
(855) 772-1226
Anna Borisovskaya, M.D. 1740 NE, 86th Street
Suite 309
Seattle, WA 98115
(206) 851-2471
Ronald L. Horn, M.D. 3715 South Hudson Street
Suite 103
Seattle, WA 98118
(206) 931-5387
Ronald L. Horn, M.D. 3715 South Hudson Street
Seattle, WA 98118
(206) 931-5387
Charles Jacob Mayer, M.D. Rainier Park Medical Clinic
4400 37th Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98118
(206) 461-6957
Emily Brown Ashbaugh, M.D. 550 16th Avenue
Suite 400
Seattle, WA 98118
(206) 320-2484
Prudencio Galvez Tible, M.D. Rainier Beach Medical Clinic
5023 South Barton Place
Seattle, WA 98118
(206) 725-8043
Jennifer Lee Trieu, M.D. 1401 Madison Street
Suite 100
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 386-6111
Jeremy D. Johnson, M.D. 550 16th Avenue
Suite 100
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 320-2484
Kevin A Kless, M.D. 550 16th Avenue
Suite 100
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 320-2484
Kyla Brydon, M.D. 550 16th Avenue
Suite 100
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 320-2484
Shannon L. Barkley, M.D. Swedish Medical Center
747 Broadway
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 296-4772
Alex Joseph Kipp, M.D. 550 16th Avenue Suite 100
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 320-2484
Louis Paul Gianutsos, M.D. 550 16th Avenue
Suite 100
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 320-2484


ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

A Presidential briefing on March 19, 2018 in Manchester, NH was used to announce that ADAPT Pharma has volunteered to provide, for free, the life-saving medication NARCAN® to all U.S. high schools, colleges and universities.

NARCAN® is a name brand overdose antidote (based on naloxone) that restores breathing and consciousness in opioid overdose victims typically within five minutes.

ADAPT Pharma offers a 40% discount off wholesale pricing on the Narcan nasal spray to Law Enforcement agencies and Firefighters as well as non-profit community based organizations.

Seamus Mulligan, CEO of ADAPT, commented in a company press release that ADAPT is committed to raising awareness of opioid overdose risks and distributing NARCAN® widely so that it will be available to bystanders and emergency personnel who can offer immediate help in the event of a crisis.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Methadone, Naloxone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

What Is Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an opioid treatment medication that works very differently than either methadone or buprenorphine.

Naltrexone functions as an opioid blocker that interferes with the euphoric effects of opiates. Unlike methadone, naltrexone does not eliminate opioid withdrawal. So it is typically only begun following a successful period of opioid detoxification.

Naltrexone is taken as a pill or as a time-released injectable. It blocks the feeling of getting high thus deterring a person from continuing in active drug use with opioids. If there’s no pay off for using, why do it?

Some individuals who don’t necessarily require methadone or buprenorphine can effectively utilize naltrexone as a component of their recovery program. Vivitrol is the time-released, branded version of naltrexone that is taken once monthly as an injection. With Vivitrol, the naltrexone remains active in the bloodstream for 30 days and blocks the effects of heroin or other opiate use. This reinforces one’s focus on recovery choices and can reduce opioid cravings.

Patients receiving naltrexone may develop a lowered tolerance to opioids over time, and should remain aware of the risk of opioid overdose should they relapse. The medication is also used in the treatment of alcohol dependency and has been shown to reduce the euphoric effects of alcohol consumption.

Naltrexone is not to be confused with Naloxone. Naloxone is the opioid overdose reversal medication that has recently been in the news for saving thousands of lives across the country.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Drug Treatment, Methadone Clinics, Naltrexone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Vivitrol | Comments Off on What Is Naltrexone

Billions To Be Allocated In Fight Against Opioid Crisis

The national budget proposal for the 2019 fiscal year includes a request for $13 billion in funding for opioid treatment and related services. This linked Newsweek article states that $3 billion would be allocated in 2018 and another $10 billion in 2019.

Many opioid treatment programs across the country are currently able to add patient slots when additional funding is made available. The opioid crisis has flooded many clinics that are already at maximum census due to limited State and Medicaid funding.

A number of private pay clinics have opened in recent years as the need for medication-assisted treatment increased. If a substantial allocation of government funds becomes available, opioid treatment services will finally come into sharp national focus as scores of people finally obtain the help they need to stabilize and to recover.

In treating opioid addiction, research has shown that traditional abstinence-based programs which do not utilize medication assistance have a failure rate of 90%. Medication-assistance is a critical factor in helping opioid addicted people move into sustained recovery. The proposed $13 billion earmarked for opioid treatment services can make a huge difference all across the U.S. Methadone or buprenorphine (suboxone) coupled with counseling and drug testing comprise the gold standard of care in treating opioid addiction.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Buprenorphine, Drug Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Benefits, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone News, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors | Comments Off on Billions To Be Allocated In Fight Against Opioid Crisis

Opioid Treatment Making A Difference

There is a great article in the Bismarck Tribune about the expansion of methadone services in Fargo, North Dakota. Fargo, like most other areas of the country, was impacted in recent years by numerous opioid-related overdose deaths.

The article reports that Cass County had 31 overdose deaths in 2016, but that number was reduced to 15 in 2017, due in part to the increased availability of naloxone (the medication that reverses opioid overdose).

While local ambulance calls have decreased in relation to opioid overdoses, the problem of opioid addiction remains a widespread and primary concern in the community.

The Tribune story reveals that more local residents are now enrolled in opioid treatment and are receiving the life-saving medication, methadone. Treatment that combines medication-assistance and counseling is the industry standard in quality care for those addicted to opioids.

The new Fargo-based clinic is reported to have 164 active patients currently enrolled in the methadone program. The clinic director, Mark Schaefer, is quoted as saying that while enrollment has been rapid, there remain many people in the local area with untreated opioid addiction.

The availability of treatment is making a difference. And medications like methadone, buprenorphine, and naloxone are providing a much needed solution to America’s opioid crisis.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Buprenorphine, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Naloxone, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Opioid Treatment Making A Difference