Category Archives: Addiction Treatment

Learning Recovery Through Counseling

Counseling and support services are an integral part of the treatment process. Recovery from opioid addiction involves education on the addictive process and the development of skills that support lifestyle change.

Medication assistance is key in managing opioid withdrawal sickness, but counseling offers the opportunity to learn valuable skills like identifying common high risk triggers for relapse and methods for reducing that risk.

Addiction is a complex illness. Many patients who achieve early stability with methadone or suboxone will relax their commitment to treatment. They let their guard down and begin to take shortcuts. This is a frequent issue in treatment clinics that often leads to relapse.

Sustained recovery from addiction requires a full commitment to change. Individual counseling and group counseling provide the necessary roadmap for staying on the recovery path. Counseling allows patients to achieve a deeper understanding of the challenges they will face as they learn to live drug free.

Opioid addiction can seriously impact a person’s life in many areas, and climbing out of that hole is not easy. Making the correct recovery-based decisions can at times be confusing, and even feel overwhelming. This is where the value of support & input from a counselor, stable friends, and concerned others can make a real difference.

Most MAT clinics and physician practices across the U.S. provide counseling as a component of their opioid treatment program. Participate in these services. These sessions with a therapist or in a counseling group can greatly enhance your ability to stay on course, and ride out the difficult days that you will certainly encounter. There is no replacement for commitment and positive action. These are the foundation of success when true recovery is the goal.

Buprenorphine After Overdose Facilitates Treatment

Several articles recently addressed a study which found that providing buprenorphine after an overdose significantly increased the likelihood of individuals accessing opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment.

The current protocol for paramedics and emergency departments in treating opioid overdose is to administer naloxone in order to reverse the effects of overdose. A recently published study showed that also providing buprenorphine immediately afterward reduced withdrawal discomfort and increased outpatient addiction follow-up care.

A separate article referenced data showing a nearly six-fold increase in patients accessing outpatient addiction treatment within 30 days of the overdose event.

These are highly encouraging finds which demonstrate the far-reaching effectiveness of medication-assistance in the treatment of opioid addiction. Saving a life through overdose reversal is obviously a critical benefit, but increasing motivation for follow-up treatment is a huge step in helping addicted individuals plug into a long-term solution.

Structured treatment which utilizes medication-assistance provides so much to those aspiring to face their addiction challenges. Naloxone, buprenorphine, and methadone have saved countless lives, and these medications have provided an unrivaled opportunity for those in opioid addiction to plot a new path in life.

Over 1 Billion Dollars to Fight Opioid Crisis

The U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services has awarded $1.5 billion in an effort to support States in their fight against opioid addiction.

The grant programs will provide funding to increase access to “24/7 Opioid Treatment Programs”. $104 million will be specifically allocated to bring treatment services to rural areas of the country that have been historically underserved.

While stabilizing and rebuilding lives through medication-assisted treatment is a priority, the prevention of overdose deaths is a distinct goal of the new funding initiative. Major confiscation of fentanyl continues month to month as law enforcement authorities intercept huge quantities of the drug pouring across the southern border.

Another $20.5 million is being earmarked for the development of programs that help connect individuals with addiction issues to local community resources that can enhance their overall recovery effort.

Additional focus will be placed on increasing the availability of naloxone which is the emergency medication that can quickly reverse the effects of opioid overdose. Thousands of lives have been saved in the last 10 years through the timely administration of naloxone to those who have overdosed.

The White House report outlines further efforts to disrupt global drug trafficking through the addition of more law enforcement officers.

BrightView Offers Local Addiction Treatment

BrightView provides high quality addiction treatment with a specialty in opioid addiction recovery. Currently, the organization operates in six states: Ohio, Kentucky, Virginia, Delaware, North Carolina, and Massachusetts.

BrightView was originally founded by a doctor, a lawyer, and a businessman with the intent of transforming addiction medicine. In Cincinnati, opioid addiction had severely impacted the local community as it had done in so many other areas of the country.

Consequently, BrightView founders wanted to design a system of service delivery that would make it easy for people affected by opioid addiction to get the help they needed with minimal obstacles and delays.

While most BrightView clinics specialize in the use of buprenorphine, suboxone, and vivitrol, several clinics also offer methadone. Their recovery model is built upon a combination of top tier medication-assisted treatment in conjunction with counseling and behavioral therapies.

In addition to opioid-specific treatment services, BrightView also offers specialized treatment for alcohol, methamphetamine, and other substance use disorders. Being patient-centered is a hallmark of the company’s approach to helping.

Most BrightView facilities can see a patient within 24 hours of calling for an appointment. If interested in contacting BrightView, you can reach them at 866-928-5995.

Longer Duration Opioid Treatment Improves Outcomes

A new study by the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Wisconsin found that a patient’s length of treatment is directly tied to lower risk of overdose.

In particular, treating opioid addiction with medication for at least 60 days generated a 61% reduction in the incidence of overdose.

Numerous other studies over the last two decades have shown that positive outcomes are tied to longer duration in outpatient addiction treatment. Not only does greater length of time in treatment allow for physical stabilization with methadone or buprenorphine, but it provides each patient with time to develop improved coping skills and relapse prevention capability.

Higher levels of functioning are able to be achieved, such as gainful employment and improved parenting, when a patient is able to remain in addiction treatment for longer periods of time.

Marguerite Burns, who led the Wisconsin study, found that recovery success and overdose prevention are enhanced the longer that patients take medication over a 12 month period. Medication-assistance plays a key role in helping opioid addicted patients find long lasting recovery.

Impressively, the study was based on treatment outcomes recorded for 293,160 Medicaid patients diagnosed with opioid use disorder.