Albuquerque Suboxone Doctors

Join Here To Have Your Medical Practice Featured in this space
and in the Google Map located below

Following payment completion, please send us the listing information you would like displayed here.

methadone8c



A search of Albuquerque produces a great list of physicians who can prescribe suboxone to patients facing opioid withdrawal. Addiction to opiates results in a mix of uncomfortable withdrawal effects (nausea, chills, diarrhea, insomnia, body ache, etc) which bring about chronic stress and can lead to anxiety, depressive feelings, and diminished ability to meet one’s daily responsibilities. Buprenorphine is the therapeutic ingredient in Suboxone that reduces opiate withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone has become a popular and effective opioid replacement medication that restores a person’s functioning following a period of decline in active opioid addiction. Only approved physicians are legally able to write prescriptions for buprenorphine/suboxone. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Albuquerque area residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.




Albuquerque Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Marcello A. Maviglia, M.D. Duke City Recovery Toolbox, LLC
912 1st Street, NE
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 224-9777
Steven L. Ogas, M.D. First Choice South Broadway
1401 William Street. SE
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 768-5450
Linda Ann Smoker, M.D. 1209 University North East
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 272-4400
Lawrence D. Abramson, M.D. 912 First Street NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 224-9777
Julie Silverhart, M.D. 1401 William Street SE
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 768-5450
Valerie Carrejo, M.D. UNM Family Medicine Clinic
2400 Tucker Avenue, NE
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 272-1734
Michelle James Iandiorio, M.D. Truman Health Services
801 Encisno Place, NE
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 272-1312
Jennifer Ann Pentecost, M.D. 1401 Williams SE
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 768-5450
Christopher J. Camarata, M.D. 1209 University Avenue
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 272-4400
Jane W. McGrath, M.D. 625 Silver SW
Suite 324
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 925-7600
Anne Salazar Ortiz, M.D. 1307 Rio Grande Boulevard, NW
Suite 8
Albuquerque, NM 87104
(505) 350-8997
James Ross Shiveley, D.O. 1817 Central Avenue, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87104
(505) 243-7839
Will Kaufman, M.D. 2001 North Centro Familiar, SW
Albuquerque, NM 87105
(505) 873-7400
Kathleen Van Osten, M.D. Casa de Salud
1608 Isleta Boulevard SW
Albuquerque, NM 87105
(505) 870-3563
William Bridges Hunter, M.D. Turquoise Lodge
6000 Isleta Boulevard, SW
Albuquerque, NM 87105
(505) 841-8978
Vanessa Jacobsohn 2001 North Centro Familiar
First Choice Community Healthcare
Albuquerque, NM 87105
(505) 873-7400
George Edwin Davis, M.D. 3005 Santa Clara Avenue South East
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 841-4369
Florian Birkmayer, M.D. The Birkmayer Institute
2418 Miles Road, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 720-4115
George D. Comerci, Jr., M.D., FACP University of New Mexico:HSC.
2211 Lomas Boulevard
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 272-6476
Patrick J. Abbott, M.D. ASAP
2600 Yale SE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 994-7999
Michael Bogenschutz, M.D. 2350 Alamo SE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 768-0130
Lori Willinghurst, M.D. Albuquerque Indian Health Service
801 Vussar NE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 248-7610
Juliane Nichole Bohan, M.D. 2600 Yale S.E.
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 994-7999
Snehal Rudresh Bhatt, M.D. Addictions and Substance Abuse Program
2600 Yale Boulevard, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 994-7999
Jennette Cross, M.D. 1209 University Boulevard NE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 272-4400
Claire Wilcox, M.D. ASAP
2450 Alamo, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 925-2400
Carletta Bullock, M.D. New Mexico Department of Health
1111 Stanford Drive, NE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 841-4100
John N. Russo, M.D. Albuquerque Indian Health Center
801 Vassor, NE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
(505) 975-2440
Nancy Alyson Porter, M.D. NM Department of Health
2400 Wellesley, NE
Albuquerque, NM 87107
(505) 841-4100
Julia Teresa Gallegos, M.D. 1218 Griegos NW
Albuquerque, NM 87107
(505) 342-5474
John Matthew Tanner, M.D. 172 Montano Road
Albuquerque, NM 87107
(505) 344-4427
Maryalyse Adams Mercado, M.D. 1231 Candelaria NW
Albuquerque, NM 87107
(505) 345-3244
Ursula Renee Roblero, M.D. South East Heights Clinic
302 San Pablo, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 272-5885
Brooke Parish, M.D. Turqouise Lodge
5901 Zoni, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 841-8978×141
Tamara Marie Goodman, M.D. Turquoise Lodge Hospital
5201 Zuni, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 841-8978
Howard S. Berger, M.D. Albuquerque VA Medical Center
1501 San Pedro Drive, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 265-1711
Melanie L. Marshall, D.O. San Pedro Family Practice
401 San Pedro NE suite G
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 503-8034
Amandeep Singh Chadha, M.D. 1501 San Pedro South East
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 265-1711
Letitia Parker Kinloch, M.D. 1501 San Pedro SE
116 Bhcl
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 265-1711
Mikyung Angela Jo, M.D. UNM Southeast Heights Clinic
8200 Central Avenue
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 272-5885
Angelo John Tomedi, M.D. Texas and Central Streets
Unm Seh Clinic
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 272-5885
Joshua Leiderman, M.D. SE Heights Clinic, Univ. of New Mexico
8200 Central SE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 272-5885
Gilbert Esser, M.D. 1501 San Pedroe Drive, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 265-1772×440
Joanna Jane Hooper, M.D. 8200 Central Avenue, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 272-5885
Robert M. Khanlian, M.D. 209 San Mateo Boulevard NE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 262-1538
Cynthia Ma Geppert, M.D., Ph.D. NM Veterans Administration Health Care
1510 San Pedro Drive, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 265-1711×5551
Cristina M. Martinez, M.D. VAMC
1501 San Pedro, SE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
(505) 265-1711



Methadone Clinic North Dakota

methadone north dakotaIt was announced in June that North Dakota would be receiving its first methadone clinic. North Dakota and Wyoming are the only two states in the U.S. that have yet to provide a methadone treatment program for opioid addiction.

The region has suffered in recent years with an increase in the use of heroin and fentanyl, and with associated opioid overdoses. Kurt Snyder is the Executive Director of the new clinic, Heartview Foundation. Mr. Snyder echoed the research-based evidence showing that medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction provides superior results to abstinence-only treatment interventions.

In the article linked above from The Jamestown Sun, a local police detective indicated that the addiction problem had recently worsened in North Dakota as a result of the price of drugs dropping.

The Heartview Foundation clinic will also offer buprenorphine and naloxone in addition to methadone thus providing a more complete range of medication assisted therapies. Therapeutic counseling and mental health treatment will be a component of the Heartview program as well as drug testing.

Of particular benefit too is the recent initiative in North Dakota that will allow pharmacists the ability to prescribe naloxone so that opioid overdoses can hopefully be greatly reduced. The ready accessibility of naloxone is receiving a nationwide push as communities struggle to address overdose concerns.

Methadone.US welcomes a new addition to the featured clinics here on the site with the listing of BrookStone Medical Center in St. George, Utah.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Drug Rehab Programs, Drug Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Methadone Clinic North Dakota

Buprenorphine Implant for Opioid Addiction

buprenorphine implantThe FDA has approved a new implantable drug called Probuphine. Probuphine contains the partial opioid agonist, buprenorphine, which is used to suppress the opioid withdrawal symptoms that interfere with daily life.

The implant is the size of a matchstick and is inserted under the skin in the forearm area. It steadily releases a dose of buprenorphine which has been scientifically proven an effective treatment for eliminating opiate withdrawal symptoms in a number of people physically dependent on opioids.

With heroin and opioid overdose deaths at an all time high in the United States, this new alternative offers one more beneficial path for anyone struggling with opioid relapse and chronic withdrawal. Importantly, Probuphine only treats the physical withdrawal from opioids such that the underlying psychological factors of addiction must still be treated through counseling and other support approaches.

The Wall Street Journal has an extensive article on this new medication and the historically important role of methadone and oral buprenorphine. In the article, Nora Volkow (director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse) is quoted as saying:

Scientific evidence suggests that maintenance treatment with these medications in the context of behavioral treatment and recovery support are more effective in the treatment of opioid-use disorder than short-term detoxification programs aimed at abstinence.

Over 47,000 people died in the U.S. of drug overdoses in 2014. A majority of these were attributed to heroin and prescription painkillers. With continued coverage in the media and ongoing community discussion, more answers and helpful interventions will hopefully see the light of day.

Methadone Information | Suboxone Information

Posted in Buprenorphine, Drug Treatment, Heroin, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Opiate Addiction, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Buprenorphine Implant for Opioid Addiction

President Proposes Funding Increase for Treating Opioid Addiction

funding drug treatmentPresident Obama recently attended the National Prescription Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta, Georgia. Professionals and concerned citizens used the forum to explore ways to address America’s rising opioid addiction problem.

The President agreed that increased funding is needed to raise access to drug treatment in an effort to simply avoid incarcerating those addicted to heroin and other potentially deadly opioids.

The NBC article referenced here states that over 28,000 people died last year from opioid overdose in the United States. This number has quadrupled since 1999. Many of the overdoses occur from various opioids laced with a powerful prescription pain killer called fentanyl.

Methadone and buprenorphone (the active ingredient in suboxone) are the leading medications used in medication-assisted treatment approaches. Naloxone is another important medication which has been used to reverse opioid overdose. It has saved thousands of lives and is being widely adopted by first responders and police departments across the country due to its proven effectiveness.

President Obama expressed that the U.S. will move toward improved drug treatment access for opioid addicted individuals and that the issue of addiction will be dealt with more as a public health issue as opposed to strictly a criminal act. Included in the proposed legislation is doubling the patient limit such that doctors can treat up to 200 people with buprenorphine (suboxone). The current patient limit is 100.

The Department of Health and Human Services is reported to have committed another $94 million to community health centers to boost their provision of medication-assisted treatment in poor and isolated communities. Many rural areas of the U.S. have very limited availability of opioid addiction services.

Online Methadone Assessment

Posted in Buprenorphine, Heroin, Heroin Overdose, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Opiate Addiction, Opiate Prescription, Opioid Addiction, Prescription Drugs, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics | Comments Off on President Proposes Funding Increase for Treating Opioid Addiction

PBS Special on Heroin Addiction in America

frontlinePBS’ Frontline series of specials just aired a compelling documentary by the name of Chasing Heroin. The two hour investigation profiles a number of individuals who became addicted to opioids, some of whom chose methadone or suboxone to help them successfully manage their addictive disorder.

The documentary highlights that addiction is best addressed as a medical illness instead of a punishable criminal act. There is widespread consensus today that putting large numbers of people in prison for drug use has not been an effective approach to the problem of drug addiction.

Incarcerating users is very costly and ultimately does not lead to remaining drug free once released from prison. For those suffering with a chronic opioid addiction, medication assisted treatment has become the standard of care proven to be most effective – particularly for those individuals who have tried others forms of treatment that did not work.

The Frontline documentary linked above is very informative, but please be forewarned that it does display vivid scenes of drug use that some viewers may find disturbing. So please exercise appropriate caution before viewing.

To Learn More About Detox, Methadone, or Suboxone

Posted in Heroin, Heroin Overdose, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Treatment, NIMBY, Opiate Addiction, Opioid Addiction, Suboxone, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , , | Comments Off on PBS Special on Heroin Addiction in America