Philadelphia Suboxone Doctors

Philadelphia Suboxone Clinic

Philadelphia Suboxone Clinic
7901 Bustleton Ave #201
Philadelphia, PA 19152

Phone: 215-709-9099
Website: PhiladelphiaSuboxoneClinic.com

At Philadelphia Suboxone Clinic, we combine superior medical care with on-site counseling services to give you an all-inclusive recovery program. Our Suboxone doctors will work with you to create your customized Suboxone treatment program that meets your unique needs. We believe in friendly and professional treatment in a non-judgmental environment, where you can heal your mind and body from the harm caused by addiction.

Our Philadelphia Suboxone Clinic provides you a family-like community that is dedicated to your sobriety goals. Addiction isn’t a one-way conversation. We really take the time to listen to you to ensure you understand your treatment and remain in control of your recovery.

Let’s take the first step towards a better life together. Call us today! 215-709-9099

Philadelphia Suboxone Clinic – Philadelphia, PA 19152

 

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Philadelphia offers an extensive array of buprenorphine-approved doctors to help opiate dependent persons have relief from opioid withdrawal symptoms. Buprenorphine has been proven effective for a majority of individuals with a mild to moderate level of opiate addiction. While Suboxone (containing buprenorphine) was used in its early years of release for short-term opiate detox, suboxone is today appropriate for long term maintenance therapy much like methadone. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Philadelphia area residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.



Philadelphia Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Philadelphia Suboxone Clinic 7901 Bustleton Ave #201
Philadelphia, PA 19152
(215) 709-9099
Christopher Justin Pagnani, M.D. 1528 Walnut Street
Suite 2005
Philadelphia, PA 19102
(267) 687-2032
Donald John Kushon, M.D. Hahnemann Hospital
17306 Ncb, Ms 403
Philadelphia, PA 19102
(215) 762-1866
Richard M. Sobel, M.D. 1518 Walnut Street
Suite 1110
Philadelphia, PA 19102
(215) 731-1901
David M. Barclay III, M.D. 1601 Walnut Street
Suite 208
Philadelphia, PA 19102
(215) 988-9824
Michael D. Miller, M.D. 255 South 17th Street
Suite 1410
Philadelphia, PA 19103
(215) 545-8450
Michael J. McCarthy, M.D. 2400 Chestnut Street, Suite 1409
Philadelphia, PA 19103
(215) 567-4773
Henry Richard Kranzler, M.D. 3900 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 222-3200
Anil K Rai, M.D. Veterans Affairs Medical Center Philadel
3900 Woodland Ave 7th Floor Psychiatry
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 823-5800
Onuorah Umeh, M.D. 4237 Baltimore Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(724) 591-5236
Vasam P. Dhopesh, M.D. VA Medical Center
Suite 116A
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 823-5800
Isabelle Arndt, M.D., Ph.D. Opiate Treatment Program, Bldg. # 7
38th & Woodland Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 823-6092
John Listerud, M.D. Philadelphia VAMC, Seventh Floor
3900 Woodland Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 823-4041
Kyle M. Kampman, M.D. Univ. of Penn, Treatment Research Ctr.
3900 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 222-3200×109
Charles Dackis, M.D. University of Pennsylvania Medical Cntr
3900 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 662-8752
Michael Gliatto, M.D. Philadelphia Veterans Admin. Med Center
38th-Woodland Ave. 7thFloor MailStop116A
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 823-4037
Steven Howard Snyderman, M.D. 51 North 39th Street
Suite W241
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 662-8600
James W. Cornish, M.D. Department of Veterans Affairs Med Ctr.
3900 Woodland Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19104-4594
(215) 823-5809
Charles P. O'Brien, M.D. UPENN, Philadelphia VAMC/MIRECC
3900 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6178
(215) 222-3200×132
Maurie Pressman, M.D. 200 Locust Street
Apartment 1705
Philadelphia, PA 19106
(215) 922-0204
George E. Woody, M.D. 150 South Independence Mall, West
Suite 600, Public Ledger Building
Philadelphia, PA 19106
(215) 399-0980×112
Nicole Andrea Matthews, D.O. 833 Chestnut Street
Suite 210
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 416-7607
Richard A. Stefanic, M.D. Rossi Wellness Center
822 Pine Street, Suite LL1
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(267) 519-2174
Richard A. Stefanic, M.D. Rossi Wellness Center
822 Pine Street, Suite LL1
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(267) 519-2174
Sam Al-Saadi, M.D. 211 South Ninth Street
Suite 500
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 955-4693
Ellen Davis Conroy, D.O. Jefferson Outpatient Psychiatry
833 Chestnut Street Suite 210
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 955-8420
Angel S. Angelov, M.D. TJUH Dept. of Psychiatry
1652 Thompson Bldg, 1020 Sansom Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 955-5308
Karam C Mounzer, M.D. 1233 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 790-1788
John J. Bowden, Jr., D.O. 205 North Broad Street
Suite 500
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 977-7844
Marna Sternbach, M.D. 833 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 955-0429
Joseph M. Garland, M.D. 1233 Locust Street, Suite 500
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 525-3047
Jessica Mosier, M.D. 833 Chestnut Street
Suite 210
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 955-8420
Helen Carol Koenig, M.D. Philadelphia FIGHT
1233 Locust Street, 5th floor
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 790-1788
William Christopher Jangro, M.D. 833 Chestnut Street
Suite 210
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 955-6592
Basant Kumar Pradhan, M.D. 833 Chestnut Street
Suite 210
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(732) 742-3180
William Wright, Jr. 7246 Rising Sun Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19111
(215) 745-7455
Heidi R. Vidal, M.D. 6239 Rising Sun Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19111
(215) 543-5199
Neil L. Isdaner, M.D. 7602 Central Avenue
Stapley Building, Suite 103
Philadelphia, PA 19111
(215) 745-7411
Lawrence Robinson, M.D. Rising Sun Medical Center
7210 Rising Sun Avenue #B
Philadelphia, PA 19111-7157
(215) 613-7145
Brian Kenneth Stein, D.O. 3790 Morrell Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19114
(215) 637-6901
Alan M. Burke, M.D. Dr. Alan Burke
1923 Welsh Road
Philadelphia, PA 19115
(800) 645-0721
Eugene Goldman, M.D. 9867 Bustleton Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19115
(215) 698-9295
Andrew Mark Berkowitz, M.D. 9622 Bustleton Avenue
Suite 2B
Philadelphia, PA 19115
(215) 947-6143
Lilia Gorovits, M.D. 9867 Bustletoll Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19115
(215) 698-9295
Stuart A. Kauffman, D.O. 1094 Welsh Road
Philadelphia, PA 19115
(215) 673-4100
Maurice Singer, D.O. 10663 Bustleton Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19116
(215) 676-3336
 


Youth and Opioid Addiction

In past decades, opioid addiction was skewed more heavily toward an older generation of adults. But today we have larger numbers of youth using opioids and experiencing addiction-related problems at earlier ages. Importantly, research has demonstrated conclusively that those who remain engaged in treatment for six months or more are much more likely to stabilize and to enjoy sustained success with recovery.

A recent Reuters Health article highlights the fact that many opioid-addicted youth are either not yet engaging in treatment or are exiting treatment too early. While more youth are being saved through the overdose reversal drug naloxone, a majority of addicted youth are still not receiving medicated-assisted treatments such as buprenorphine or methadone.

More work is necessary to open up treatment avenues for young adults across America, and to both educate & compel youth to seek MAT (medication-assisted treatment) as soon as possible.

The opioid addiction problem in America will not soon disappear. Drugs continue to find their way across the U.S. border through multiple avenues. Positive efforts are indeed bringing needed change, but the complexity and extent of opioid addiction in the U.S. will require a long-term, sustained commitment throughout the country. We must get the message out – especially to young people who may not fully grasp the power of addiction!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Heroin, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Addiction, Opioid Addiction, Recovery, Rehab For Teens, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Youth and Opioid Addiction

Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

Opioid Use Disorder is the newer clinical terminology (from the DSM5) used to describe the full range of opioid problems ranging from mild opioid-related use issues to severe opioid addiction.

The CDC reports that in 2017 there were 72,287 deaths from overdose in the United States. That is certainly an alarming statistic. Of that number, 49,060 of those deaths were from opioids specifically – just in 2017. By contrast, there were 58,200 U.S. fatalities that resulted from the entire Vietnam war.

The good news is that government funding for opioid treatment is finally entering the stream on a local level. Increasing numbers of methadone clinics and physicians authorized to prescribe buprenorphine are moving into America’s more rural areas, ones that have historically been severely underserved.

As treatment for Opioid Use Disorder becomes more readily available, people struggling under the constant pressure of addiction will have an opportunity to apply the brake, and to veer onto a new path of stability and recovery. That being said, it is estimated that presently only 1 person of 10 with an opioid use disorder has sought treatment. For many opioid addicted people, treatment made the difference between life and death.

Choose a new path is more than words for those that have truly done so. Addiction is a highly persistent disease, but change is possible. Commitment and action are the necessary ingredients in opening the door to a new life. Opioid Use Disorder, in particular, is successfully treated with medication assistance. Science, research, and life experience have fortunately reinforced this fact with perfect clarity. Please find a local treatment provider today!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

A Presidential briefing on March 19, 2018 in Manchester, NH was used to announce that ADAPT Pharma has volunteered to provide, for free, the life-saving medication NARCAN® to all U.S. high schools, colleges and universities.

NARCAN® is a name brand overdose antidote (based on naloxone) that restores breathing and consciousness in opioid overdose victims typically within five minutes.

ADAPT Pharma offers a 40% discount off wholesale pricing on the Narcan nasal spray to Law Enforcement agencies and Firefighters as well as non-profit community based organizations.

Seamus Mulligan, CEO of ADAPT, commented in a company press release that ADAPT is committed to raising awareness of opioid overdose risks and distributing NARCAN® widely so that it will be available to bystanders and emergency personnel who can offer immediate help in the event of a crisis.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Methadone, Naloxone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

What Is Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an opioid treatment medication that works very differently than either methadone or buprenorphine.

Naltrexone functions as an opioid blocker that interferes with the euphoric effects of opiates. Unlike methadone, naltrexone does not eliminate opioid withdrawal. So it is typically only begun following a successful period of opioid detoxification.

Naltrexone is taken as a pill or as a time-released injectable. It blocks the feeling of getting high thus deterring a person from continuing in active drug use with opioids. If there’s no pay off for using, why do it?

Some individuals who don’t necessarily require methadone or buprenorphine can effectively utilize naltrexone as a component of their recovery program. Vivitrol is the time-released, branded version of naltrexone that is taken once monthly as an injection. With Vivitrol, the naltrexone remains active in the bloodstream for 30 days and blocks the effects of heroin or other opiate use. This reinforces one’s focus on recovery choices and can reduce opioid cravings.

Patients receiving naltrexone may develop a lowered tolerance to opioids over time, and should remain aware of the risk of opioid overdose should they relapse. The medication is also used in the treatment of alcohol dependency and has been shown to reduce the euphoric effects of alcohol consumption.

Naltrexone is not to be confused with Naloxone. Naloxone is the opioid overdose reversal medication that has recently been in the news for saving thousands of lives across the country.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Drug Treatment, Methadone Clinics, Naltrexone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Vivitrol | Comments Off on What Is Naltrexone