San Francisco Methadone Treatment

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San Francisco provides a notable number of opioid treatment alternatives from supervised methadone clinics to private physicians prescribing suboxone (buprenorphine). Counseling is a requirement for those who receive opioid replacement therapy area. Suboxone has established itself as an effective medication for relief from opiate withdrawal symptoms for a significant number of people. Here on the Methadone.US website are links to more information on methadone’s benefits vs. risks, opioid dependence, the role of counseling in addiction treatment, and current job openings in U.S. methadone clinics.





San Francisco Methadone Clinics
BAART Turk Street Clinic
FACET
433 Turk Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
(415) 928-7800
BAART Behavioral Health Services Inc
Market Street Clinic
1111 Market Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 863-3883
Westside Methadone Treatment Program 1301 Pierce Street
San Francisco, CA 94115
(415) 563-8200
Fort Help LLC 915 Bryant Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 777-9953
San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH)
Opiate Trt Outpt Prog/Methadone Detox
1001 Potrero Avenue, Building 93
San Francisco, CA 94110
(415) 206-8412
San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH)
Substance Abuse Servs/Meth Maintenance
1001 Potrero Avenue, Building 90 Ward 93
San Francisco, CA 94110
(415) 206-8412
Bayview Hunters Point Foundation
Substance Abuse Programs
1625 Carroll Street
San Francisco, CA 94124
(415) 822-8200×12
Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Substance Abuse Programs
4150 Clement Street, Unit 116-E
San Francisco, CA 94121
(415) 221-4810×2818
VA Mental Health Clinic 525 21st Street
Oakland, CA 94612
(510) 587-3400
Berkeley Addiction Treatment Services 2975 Sacramento Street
Berkeley, CA 94702
(510) 644-0200

 

San Francisco Buprenorphine Treatment
Laurene Spencer, M.D. BAART Market Street Clinic
1111 Market Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 863-3883×163
Vinh Ngo, M.D. 508 A 14th Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 864-4444
Hanya Barth, M.D. 1200 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 255-1200
Thomas Prendergast, D.O. FT Help
915 Bryant Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 777-9953
Aaron Vance Blackledge, M.D. 508 A 14th Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 864-4444
Charles Parker Windham, M.D. Mobile Crisis Treatment Team
1520 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 355-8300
Audrey Sellers, M.D. 1111 Market St., 1st Flr.
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 863-3883
Kelly Pfeifer, M.D. San Francisco Health Plan
201 Third Street, 7th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 615-4232
Thomas Prendergast, D.O. 915 Bryant Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(510) 727-9756
Robert Paul Cabaj, M.D. 1380 Howard Street
5th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 255-3447
David F. Hersh, M.D. 1380 Howard Street
2nd Floor
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 255-3601
Reda Z Sobky, M.D., PhD 915 Bryant Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 777-9953
Dan Alan Kalshan, M.D. 220 Montgomery Street
Suite 946
San Francisco, CA 94104
(415) 433-7000
Amy Catherine Noack, M.D. VA Downtown Clinic
401 3rd Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
(415) 551-7320
David Lane Pakter, M .D. Potrero Hill Health Center
1050 Wisconsin St
San Francisco, CA 94107
(415) 648-3011
Masaru Fisher, M.D. 760 Harrison Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
(415) 836-1724
Michael Joseph Drennan, M.D. 1050 Wisconsin Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
(415) 920-1213
Sushma Zakkula Magnuson, M.D. 1050 Wisconsin Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
(415) 920-1211
Paul D. Abramson, M.D. 450 Sutter Street
Suite 300
San Francisco, CA 94108
(415) 963-4431
Carolyn Ann Schuman, M.D. Reliance Center
450 Sutter Street, Suite 300
San Francisco, CA 94108
(415) 788-0500
Harm Reduction Therapy Center 423 Gough Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
(415) 863-4282×3
BAART FACET
Geary Street Clinic and FACET
433 Turk Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
(415) 928-7800
Joe Healy Medical Detoxification
Project
120 Page Street
Floors 2 and 3
San Francisco, CA 94102
(415) 553-4490
Haight Ashbury Free Clinics Inc 1735 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 552-2114
BAART Behavioral Health Services Inc
Market Street Clinic
1111 Market Street
1st Floor
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 863-3883
Walden House
Substance Abuse Treatment and MH Servs
890 Hayes Street
San Francisco, CA 94117
(415) 701-5100
Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Substance Abuse Program
4150 Clement Street
Unit 116-E
San Francisco, CA 94121
(415) 221-4810×2818
Ohlhoff Recovery Programs
Ohlhoff Women's Residential Program
601 Steiner Street
San Francisco, CA 94127
(415) 621-4388×14
Walden House
Adult Residential Program TI
1445 Chinook Court
San Francisco, CA 94130
(415) 989-4902


Stepping Onto The Path of Recovery

the-pathAn important consideration in examining the disease of addiction is the recognition that “recovery” is an incremental process. Many people facing their addiction will experience brief setbacks, and some will struggle for years before they are able to remain on the path of positive change.

As a counselor, I have listened to many recovering individuals talk about their resistance to change. Addiction is a persistent disease of disruptive thinking and behavior highly subject to repetition. Addicts will repeat the same bad “choices” as a result of many factors. Scientific research has shown that habitual patterns of behavior are neurochemically driven deep within the brain. These patterns can be reinforced by one’s social connections, immediate environment, and underlying belief system.

With severe levels of addiction sustained over years, it can become difficult for people to shift their lifestyle, thinking, and decision-making toward a healthy, recovery-oriented mindset. In 12 Step recovery, there is the popular expression called “hitting bottom”. This expression is typically used to describe a specific time in which a person has lost so much, or suffered such a painful crisis, that their readiness for change finally emerges. This window of opportunity is often times short-lived. Hitting bottom will compel some people to finally take the right action – to seek help – to admit they have a problem. If this happens, then a decision to step onto the path of recovery may actually occur.

Active addition is often characterized by a short range view in which consequences are not thoroughly considered. Focusing on consequences interferes with the compulsive desire to use. And even then, a recognition of consequences to oneself and family is often not enough to change the decision to get high. With opiate addiction, the decision to use is overwhelmingly controlled by opiate withdrawal sickness. This never-ending physical sickness takes people away from recovery and keeps them trapped in a desperate existence centered around doing whatever is necessary to avoid being “dope sick”.

Fortunately, this dilemma can be addressed through medication-assisted treatments (methadone, suboxone, naltrexone). These do not replace the need for a recovery program, but they become an important part of one’s overall personal recovery program. Staying on the path of recovery is the next critical phase after stepping onto the path. Medication-assisted treatment greatly aids recovering addicts in staying on the proper path. Science has proven that those with the greatest chance of long-term, successful sobriety are those that remain in treatment and recovery. Said differently, a person’s chance of recovery success is statistically improved the longer they remain in treatment.

When a person no longer has to face the crippling weight of daily withdrawal sickness, they have a chance to re-approach their overall recovery and the opportunities that lie ahead of them.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Naltrexone, Recovery, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics | Tagged , | Comments Off

Reducing Risk of IV-Related Infections

drug-safetyOne of the risks associated with the progression of opioid addiction is the increased probability of an addicted person moving to injectable heroin as a last resort in dealing with opioid withdrawal. In the early years of methadone’s adoption in treatment centers, it was used primarily to help heroin addicted individuals detox from heroin and eventually remain heroin free.

While heroin is definitely resurfacing, the opioid epidemic of recent years has primarily been about prescription opioids taken orally. Following this pattern of use, users eventually discover that crushing and snorting pills is a more efficient means of getting an opioid into their system. Injecting is typically the last step in this progression of the disease of addiction.

But with injection comes a variety of new risks and health problems such as skin abscesses, localized infection at the site of injection, as well as hepatitis C (a viral infection of the liver) and HIV infection acquired through needle sharing with infected persons. A recent story in the news highlighted a sudden increase in HIV infections in Scott County (Indiana) in conjunction with the rise of opioid addiction there and injectable drug use.

Indiana’s governor has temporarily approved the use of needle exchange programs to help reduce the risk of virus transmission resulting from the use of dirty needles. The story indicated that the number of documented HIV infections had risen month over month. The county is presently trying to locate over 100 people who may have been exposed to the HIV virus in connection with injecting opiates.

Methadone and other medication-assisted treatments have been conclusively proven to reduce heroin/opiate relapse and injection drug use. For many individuals trapped in a daily cycle of perpetual drug abuse, the risk of acquiring a deadly infection increases with every day that they are not in treatment receiving help.

Treatment leads to recovery, and recovery leads to dramatic lifestyle change. Many patients who choose methadone as a tool in their personal recovery never go back to injecting drugs. This obviously is a life saving choice.

Someone recently stated “If you’re dead, you can’t recovery.” This is a rather blunt way of expressing a profound and meaningful truth. Addiction does rob loved ones, friends, family, and neighbors of life, health, and happiness. Recovery has the ability to restore all of these. Let us keep our minds and hearts open about the value of medication-assisted treatment. It is making a real difference for numerous people around the world.

Posted in Drug Safety, Harm Reduction, Heroin, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

Acadia HealthCare Opioid Addiction Treatment

acadia-healthcareAcadia Healthcare is a leading behavioral healthcare services provider headquartered out of Franklin, Tennessee. The company was established in 2005 and has experienced rapid growth as a result of strategic acquisitions and a sharp focus on the delivery of psychiatric and chemical dependency treatment services.

Acadia recently bought out CRC Health Group for a reported $1.2 billion in a well-publicized sale which closed in February 2015. The acquisition significantly expanded Acadia’s opioid addiction treatment capabilities adding approximately 82 methadone/suboxone facilities nationwide. The company is nicely positioned to serve tens of thousands of patients on a daily basis who are struggling with opioid addiction and other associated illnesses. Methadone and buprenorphine products are utilized in association with a variety of counseling approaches.

Just added to Methadone.US are five of Acadia’s opioid treatment clinics located in San Diego, Riverside, Baltimore, Portland, and Southern Indiana.

Acadia’s mission statement:

Acadia Healthcare’s mission is to create behavioral health centers where people receive care that enables them to regain hope in a supportive, caring environment.

The company presently has behavioral healthcare facilities in 37 U.S. states, the United Kingdom, and Puerto Rico. These include residential treatment centers, inpatient psychiatric hospitals, outpatient clinics, and therapeutic school-based programs.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Drug Rehab Programs, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Programs, Methadone Success, Methadone Treatment, Opiate Addiction, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics, Suboxone Doctors | Tagged , | Comments Off

Right Path Clinics Offer Suboxone and Addiction Counseling

right-path-clinics-2Right Path is an opioid treatment provider operating in the greater Hampton Roads area of eastern Virginia. The organization specializes in the use of burprenorphine (the critical ingredient in Suboxone that alleviates opioid withdrawal symptoms).

Right Path currently have outpatient services in Virginia Beach, Newport News, and Suffolk, but plan to soon offer a location convenient for residents and visitors along the Outer Banks.

Recognizing the importance of individualized treatment plans, Right Path tailor their services to the needs of the individual patient. While suboxone is beneficial in eliminating the pain of opioid withdrawal, addiction counseling is essential in helping patients to understand the addiction and recovery process. Right Path provide addiction counseling as a component of their overall treatment program.

Evening and weekend hours are offered, and most insurance is accepted. The Right Path website has a helpful page that outlines various questions and issues that you might cover with your Suboxone Doctor in your first appointment. Their website provides another highly informative page on Suboxone which answers many common questions about this increasingly popular medication. More information on Right Path’s locations and contact information can be obtained here:

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Buprenorphine, Drug Treatment, Methadone, Opiate Addiction, Opiate Treatment, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , , | Comments Off

Evzio For Reversal of Opioid Overdose

evzio-naloxoneEvzio is an FDA-approved emergency treatment that counteracts the effects of opioid overdose. It is an “auto-injector” designed to contain a retractable needle and a 0.4 mg dose of naloxone. Naloxone is a powerful opioid antagonist that reverses the effects of overdose with heroin or other opiates. Naloxone has been used throughout the country in the past few years and literally saved hundreds of lives.

evzio-imageKaleo Pharma is the manufacturer of Evzio. The company specializes in innovative solutions for serious and life threatening medical conditions. Kaleo Pharma is based out of Richmond, Virginia, USA.

As has been documented in national media, very potent forms of heroin have become available much of it laced with other opiate derivatives like fentanyl. These combinations have proven lethal in a large number of cases often with younger people being the victims of overdose due to not understanding the extreme potency of the drugs being sold.

Products like Evzio in the hands of family and local emergency response teams can yield life saving interventions within minutes.

When addicted people survive a near fatal overdose, this often acts as a necessary catalyst to enter treatment and to step onto the path of personal recovery. Overdose survivors sometimes reflect on what has happened to them and may realize the pain that their death would have caused their children, friends, and family. The vast majority of overdoses are accidental and are nearly always preventable.

It is important to remember that addiction is an illness and that addicted people can recover, and can go on to live much improved lives when they are ready to change. Evzio will most likely save many people and give them that opportunity to live a life of real recovery.

For more about naloxone

Posted in Evzio, Heroin, Heroin Overdose, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Overdose, Naloxone, Opiate Addiction, Recovery, Suboxone | Tagged , , , | Comments Off