Houston Suboxone Doctors

Houston Suboxone Doctor

Houston Suboxone Doctor
2040 N. Loop West, Ste 330A
Houston, TX 77018

Phone: 713-999-6062
Website: HoustonSuboxoneClinic.com

At Houston Suboxone Clinic, we are here to support you throughout your entire recovery journey. When you come to our clinic, you will meet with a Suboxone doctor to complete a comprehensive examination to measure overall health and personalize your drug addiction treatment. We help patients with primary care needs and have on-site counseling with a psychologist.

We want to see you succeed and will support you throughout the entire process. Our relaxed and comforting environment allows you to focus on drug addiction treatment and achieving all your recovery goals. Houston Suboxone Clinic can give you the strength to live a positive and substance-free life.

We want to help you end your addiction and change your life – call us today: 713-999-6062

Houston Suboxone Clinic – 2040 N Loop W #330A

 

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Houston has been affected like many other areas of the country by the epidemic of opioid addiction. However, Houston has a progressive medical community that recognizes the efficacy of using suboxone to treat opioid withdrawal. Opioid replacement therapy is a proven best practice, and suboxone (containing the active ingredient buprenorphine) is one of the leading medications now utilized to help patients cope with debilitating opioid withdrawal. Methadone is the other leading medication and has been in use for over 40 years. Both medications have an excellent track record of success. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Houston area residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.



Houston Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Houston Suboxone Clinic 2040 N. Loop West
Ste 330A
Houston, TX 77018
(713) 999-6062
Ronald R. Buescher, M.D. 10021 South Main
Suite B3
Houston, TX 77025
(713) 668-1166
John L. Mohney, D.O. 4742 West Alabama at 610
Houston, TX 77027
(713) 626-0312
Long Nguyen, M.D. 4151 Southwest Freeway
Suite 410
Houston, TX 77027
(713) 222-7246
Ivan C. Spector, M.D. 3100 Weslayan
Suite 350
Houston, TX 77027
(713) 963-0769
Melinda Min Gu, M.D. 3400 Edloe Street
Suite 1604
Houston, TX 77027
(617) 820-1056
Mehran Rahbar, M.D. VAMC
2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 794-7689
Krishna Boddu, M.D. Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Med.
1400 Holcombe Boulevard, Suite 409
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 792-4340
Emilio Rene Cardona, M.D. Green Park One
7515 South Main, Suite 600
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 796-9993
Chris Chikazu Tokunaga, M.D. Michael E. Debakey VAMC
2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 794-8700
Junaid Kamal, M.D. 2002 Holcombe Boulevard
VAMC, Dept of Anesthesiology 145
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414
Rola El-Serag, M.D. HVAMC
2002 Holocombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 794-7635
Sara Elizabeth Allison, M.D. Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center
2002 Holcombe Blvd. 116A
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414×3402
Sarah Elizabeth Ramos, M.D. 1502 Taub Loop
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 873-4900
Nicholas M. Masozera, M.D. 2002 Holocombe Boulevard
Pc 111
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414×5280
Tso M. Chen, M.D. 2002 Holocombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414
Ali Abbas Asghar-Ali, M.D. 2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414×6771
Roham Darvishi, M.D. VA Hospital
2002 Holocombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414
Bengi B. Melton, M.D. VA Medical Center
2002 Holocombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414×6678
Robert Mark Gerber, M.D. Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center
2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 794-8700
Utpal Ghosh, M.D. 2002 Holocombe Boulevard
Mail code 111 PC
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414
James J. Ireland, M.D. 2002 Holocombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 794-7101
Nahla Nasser, M.D. 2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(832) 368-1976
Wendy L. Smitherman, M.D. Department of Psychiatry
One Baylor Plaza, BCM 350
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414×4693
Jennie F. Hall, M.D. MEDVAMC
2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414
John Victor Ibeas Fermo, M.D. MEDVAMC 116SDTP
2002 Holcombe Blvd
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414
Andrea Gail Stolar, M.D. MICHAEL E. DEBAKERY VAMC
2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414
Rabab Rizvi, M.D. VAMC
2002 Holcombe Boulevard, MC 116MHCL
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414×6415
Claudine Daniela Johnson, M.D. 2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414×3960
Yaw Boamah Frimpong-Badu, M.D. 2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414
Pilar Laborde-Lahoz, M.D. VA de BAKEY
2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 791-1414×24562
Charles DeJohn, M.D. VA Hospital, Rm. 6B-115, MHCL
2002 Holcombe Boulevard
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 794-8709
Nidal Moukaddam, M.D. Harris Health Systems/Baylor
1504 Taub Loop
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 873-4901
Benjamin T. Li, M.D. 1502 Taub Loop
2nd Floor, Room 2.216
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 873-5270
Jose Leyva, M.D. 11275 South Sam Houston Parkway West
Suite 150
Houston, TX 77031
(832) 328-4545
James Edward McCrary, D.O. 6201 Bonhomme Road
Suite 354-N
Houston, TX 77036
(832) 767-0357
Kenneth Peters, M.D. 9889 Bellaire Boulevard
Suite 103
Houston, TX 77036
(713) 988-9889
Don Gibson, M.D. 9889 Bellaire
Suite 134
Houston, TX 77036
(713) 988-0700
Jaime Ganc, M.D. 5500 Guhn Road
Suite 100
Houston, TX 77040
(713) 783-8889
Rusti T. Hauge, M.D. 5500 Guhn Road
Suite 100
Houston, TX 77040
(713) 783-8889
Jason D. Baron, M.D. 5500 Guhn Road
Suite 100
Houston, TX 77040
(713) 783-8889
Edward C. Fallick, D.O. 11000 Richmond Avenue
Unit 330
Houston, TX 77042
(713) 974-0879
Ajay K. Aggarwal, M.D. 2626 South Loop West
Suite 600
Houston, TX 77054
(713) 400-7246
Uchenna Kennedy Ojiaku, M.D. 2626 South Loop West
Suite 300
Houston, TX 77054
(202) 390-7520
Demetris Allen Green, Sr., M.D. 2646 South Loop West
Suite 440
Houston, TX 77054
(713) 808-9658
Frederick Gerard Moeller, M.D. UTHSC at Houston Texas Research Clinic
1941 East Road
Houston, TX 77054
(713) 486-2800


Youth and Opioid Addiction

In past decades, opioid addiction was skewed more heavily toward an older generation of adults. But today we have larger numbers of youth using opioids and experiencing addiction-related problems at earlier ages. Importantly, research has demonstrated conclusively that those who remain engaged in treatment for six months or more are much more likely to stabilize and to enjoy sustained success with recovery.

A recent Reuters Health article highlights the fact that many opioid-addicted youth are either not yet engaging in treatment or are exiting treatment too early. While more youth are being saved through the overdose reversal drug naloxone, a majority of addicted youth are still not receiving medicated-assisted treatments such as buprenorphine or methadone.

More work is necessary to open up treatment avenues for young adults across America, and to both educate & compel youth to seek MAT (medication-assisted treatment) as soon as possible.

The opioid addiction problem in America will not soon disappear. Drugs continue to find their way across the U.S. border through multiple avenues. Positive efforts are indeed bringing needed change, but the complexity and extent of opioid addiction in the U.S. will require a long-term, sustained commitment throughout the country. We must get the message out – especially to young people who may not fully grasp the power of addiction!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Heroin, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Addiction, Opioid Addiction, Recovery, Rehab For Teens, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Youth and Opioid Addiction

Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

Opioid Use Disorder is the newer clinical terminology (from the DSM5) used to describe the full range of opioid problems ranging from mild opioid-related use issues to severe opioid addiction.

The CDC reports that in 2017 there were 72,287 deaths from overdose in the United States. That is certainly an alarming statistic. Of that number, 49,060 of those deaths were from opioids specifically – just in 2017. By contrast, there were 58,200 U.S. fatalities that resulted from the entire Vietnam war.

The good news is that government funding for opioid treatment is finally entering the stream on a local level. Increasing numbers of methadone clinics and physicians authorized to prescribe buprenorphine are moving into America’s more rural areas, ones that have historically been severely underserved.

As treatment for Opioid Use Disorder becomes more readily available, people struggling under the constant pressure of addiction will have an opportunity to apply the brake, and to veer onto a new path of stability and recovery. That being said, it is estimated that presently only 1 person of 10 with an opioid use disorder has sought treatment. For many opioid addicted people, treatment made the difference between life and death.

Choose a new path is more than words for those that have truly done so. Addiction is a highly persistent disease, but change is possible. Commitment and action are the necessary ingredients in opening the door to a new life. Opioid Use Disorder, in particular, is successfully treated with medication assistance. Science, research, and life experience have fortunately reinforced this fact with perfect clarity. Please find a local treatment provider today!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

A Presidential briefing on March 19, 2018 in Manchester, NH was used to announce that ADAPT Pharma has volunteered to provide, for free, the life-saving medication NARCAN® to all U.S. high schools, colleges and universities.

NARCAN® is a name brand overdose antidote (based on naloxone) that restores breathing and consciousness in opioid overdose victims typically within five minutes.

ADAPT Pharma offers a 40% discount off wholesale pricing on the Narcan nasal spray to Law Enforcement agencies and Firefighters as well as non-profit community based organizations.

Seamus Mulligan, CEO of ADAPT, commented in a company press release that ADAPT is committed to raising awareness of opioid overdose risks and distributing NARCAN® widely so that it will be available to bystanders and emergency personnel who can offer immediate help in the event of a crisis.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Methadone, Naloxone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

What Is Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an opioid treatment medication that works very differently than either methadone or buprenorphine.

Naltrexone functions as an opioid blocker that interferes with the euphoric effects of opiates. Unlike methadone, naltrexone does not eliminate opioid withdrawal. So it is typically only begun following a successful period of opioid detoxification.

Naltrexone is taken as a pill or as a time-released injectable. It blocks the feeling of getting high thus deterring a person from continuing in active drug use with opioids. If there’s no pay off for using, why do it?

Some individuals who don’t necessarily require methadone or buprenorphine can effectively utilize naltrexone as a component of their recovery program. Vivitrol is the time-released, branded version of naltrexone that is taken once monthly as an injection. With Vivitrol, the naltrexone remains active in the bloodstream for 30 days and blocks the effects of heroin or other opiate use. This reinforces one’s focus on recovery choices and can reduce opioid cravings.

Patients receiving naltrexone may develop a lowered tolerance to opioids over time, and should remain aware of the risk of opioid overdose should they relapse. The medication is also used in the treatment of alcohol dependency and has been shown to reduce the euphoric effects of alcohol consumption.

Naltrexone is not to be confused with Naloxone. Naloxone is the opioid overdose reversal medication that has recently been in the news for saving thousands of lives across the country.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Drug Treatment, Methadone Clinics, Naltrexone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Vivitrol | Comments Off on What Is Naltrexone