San Antonio Suboxone Doctors

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San Antonio offers a significant number of local doctors who are approved to write prescriptions for buprenorphine. Suboxone (which incorporates buprenorphine as an additive) is being widely used across the U.S. to effectively treat mild to moderate opiate withdrawal symptoms. Opiate withdrawal is a persistent stress on those facing opiate addiction. The good news is that suboxone works quite well for a high percentage of people diagnosed with opioid addiction. If you are a local physician aiming to treat San Antonio residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.




San Antonio Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
John T. Pichot, M.D. 5625 Broadway
San Antonio, TX 78209
(210) 826-4466
Edward Joseph Lazaga, M.D. 1222 Mccullough
Suite 101
San Antonio, TX 78212
(210) 223-4140
Rolando X. Rodriguez, M.D. 130 West Woodlawn
San Antonio, TX 78212
(210) 225-5723
Edulfo Gonzalez-Sanchez 311 Camden Street
Suite 606
San Antonio, TX 78215
(210) 229-1900
Francisco J. Rodriguez, M.D. 311 Camden
Suite 11
San Antonio, TX 78215
(210) 224-1616
Segundo A. Briones, M.D. BHG San Antonio Treatment Center
519 East Quincy
San Antonio, TX 78215
(210) 299-1614
Teresita M. Brothers, M D. 10515 Gulfdale
Suite 111
San Antonio, TX 78216
(210) 227-3272
Richard Morris McCartney, M.D. Austin Hwy-Village Drive Clinic
8530 Village Drive
San Antonio, TX 78217
(210) 828-4404
Elias Jurado Lorenzana, M.D. Austin Hwy-Village Drive Clinic
8530 Village Drive
San Antonio, TX 78217
(210) 828-4404
Arthur Samuel Hernandez, M.D. 88 Briggs Street
Suite 250
San Antonio, TX 78224
(210) 923-9333
Norman L. Wulfsohn, M.D. 88 Briggs Street
Suite 250
San Antonio, TX 78224
(210) 923-9333
Anthony Michael Deep, M.D. 5835 Callaghan, Suite 321
San Antonio, TX 78228
(210) 464-1983
Maureen O. Aniakudo, M.D. VA Hospital & Clinics, Dept. of Psch.
7400 Merton Minter
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 617-4300×16879
Maxim Savillion Eckmann, M.D. 5282 Medical Drive
Suite 614
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 450-9850
John Tobis, Jr., M.D. UTHSCSA Dept. of Psychiatry
7703 Floyd Curl Drive
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 567-5433
Denise Lyn Pride, M.D. 7400 Merton Minter Boulevard
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 617-5300×5155
Rolando Antonio Medina, M.D. Audie L. Murphy VA Hospital
7400 Merton Winter Boulevard, 116 A
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 617-5130
Richard Marmel, M.D. 8231 Fredericksburg Road
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 614-4711
Jeremias Momongan Abueme, M.D. 5282 Medical Drive
Suite 130
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 615-8434
Christie Ann Ybarra, M.D. South TX Veterans Health Care System
7400 Merton Minter Blvd, Psychiatry 116A
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 617-5300
Dmitry Vito Listengarten, M.D. 8026 Floyd Curl Drive
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 575-8229
Michael Anthony Dawes, M.D. Villa Severna Building
4455 Horizon Hill
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 321-2700×6400
Julia Dawn Quinlan Villa Serena
4455 Horizon Hill
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 321-2700
Pendleton Brewster Wickersham, M.D. 4511 Horizon Hill
Unit 150
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 477-2626
Kanishka Monis, M.D. 4410 Medical Drive
Unit #390
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 614-9955
Muhammad Rais Baig, M.D. 7400 Merton Minter Boulevard
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 617-5300×17021
Robert C. Lowry, M.D. 2425 Babcock
San Antonio, TX 78229
(210) 520-7246
Christopher Lesle Wallace, M.D. Uthscsa Dept Psychiatry Mc 7792
7703 Floyd Curl Drive
San Antonio, TX 78229-3900
(210) 567-5453
Rizalina Brusas Tan, M.D. South Texas Veterans HCS, Villa Serena
4455 Horizon Boulevard
San Antonio, TX 78229-4404
(210) 321-2700×64122
Jeffrey Michael Benzick, M.D. 14800 U.S. 281 North
Suite 110
San Antonio, TX 78232
(210) 490-9850
Edmund Payne Williams IV, M.D. 1380 Pantheon Way
Suite 310
San Antonio, TX 78232
(210) 404-9696
Joseph A. Simpson, M.D. 9480 Huebner Road
Suite 210
San Antonio, TX 78240
(210) 614-9595
Habib Nathan, M.D. 9480 Huebner Road
San Antonio, TX 78240
(210) 614-9595
Abel Hipolito, M.D. 8600 Wuzrbach Road
Suite 504
San Antonio, TX 78240
(210) 614-2888
Aneta A. Schuenemeyer, M.D. 9480 Huebner Road
Suite 210
San Antonio, TX 78240
(210) 614-9595
Najah Muhamad Al-Shalchi, M.D. 7712 Eckhert Road
San Antonio, TX 78240
(210) 520-8060
Maged M. Mina, M.D. 18626 Hardy Oak Boulevard
San Antonio, TX 78258
(210) 402-6561
Audra Louise Ochsner, M.D. 1202 East Sonterra Boulevard
Suite 202
San Antonio, TX 78258
(210) 447-7947
Yousuf Jan Allawala, M.D. 20079 Stone Oak Parkway
Suite # 1200
San Antonio, TX 78258
(210) 490-0400
Kolawole Odulaja, M.D. 510 Med Court
Suite 107
San Antonio, TX 78258
(210) 455-0074
Walter W. Root, M.D. 20079 Stone Oak Parkway
Suite1285
San Antonio, TX 78258-6942
(210) 490-0400



Heroin and Prescription Drug Epidemic

senate-bill-drug-treatmentThe growing problem around opioid addiction continues to receive coverage in the media, and it has become a topic of discussion on the campaign trail because candidates are being approached throughout the country by concerned families and citizens.

Marcia Taylor, President of Partnership For Drug Free Kids, provided testimony in January to a Senate Judiciary Committee on the need to increase funding for drug prevention and drug treatment. Proposed for consideration is the CARA Senate Bill which stands for Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act. CARA would allocate funding for drug treatment and prevention resources with a goal of getting more addicted individuals into treatment, and better educating both parents and teens on the dangers of recreational opioid use.

CARA would also address the need to distribute naloxone across the U.S. to aid in the fight to reduce deaths from opioid overdose. Local law enforcement would be trained on the administration of naloxone. Prescription drug monitoring programs would also receive increased support under CARA.

Methadone and Suboxone have become familiar interventions for anyone knowledgeable on opioid addiction issues. Most state-funded opioid treatment programs in the United States are currently full and have waiting lists of addicted people who are eager to participate in medication-assisted treatment.

In America, there has been a notable expansion in recent years of treatment programs who utilize methadone or suboxone to help patients. While many of these programs are private self-pay, Medicaid presently pays for methadone-based treatment approaches in a number of U.S. states. The number of private pay programs currently outnumber state-funded and Medicaid-funded programs by a substantial margin.

Posted in Buprenorphine, Heroin, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians, Teen Substance Abuse | Tagged | Comments Off on Heroin and Prescription Drug Epidemic

Expanding Access to Medication-Assisted Treatment

opioid-treatment-in-mediaAn article in the Huffington Post recently addressed President Obama’s public comments on expanding access to opioid treatment, particularly medication-assisted treatment (MAT) like methadone or buprenorphine (suboxone).

Many members of the treatment industry and recovery community do not have a realistic grasp on the role that medication-assisted treatment can play in recovery from severe opioid addiction. Historically, the recovery community has not regarded those utilizing methadone or suboxone as truly in recovery. They emphasize total abstinence, even from methadone, despite the fact that methadone and buprenorphine have restored individuals to normal functioning and even saved lives in many cases.

There was a time some years ago, in the 12 step community, when individuals were chastised for taking psychotropic medication for depression or other mental health disorders. This criticism came from a fundamental lack of knowledge about the biological basis for many mental health disorders. Similarly, medication-assisted treatment interventions have been the subject of misunderstanding and unwarranted rejection by those with limited education on varied treatment approaches.

As America’s opioid problem continues to grow, we need real solutions rooted in medical science and research. At this point in time, medication-assisted treatment has been in use long enough to clearly demonstrate its usefulness in facilitating personal recovery from addiction.

In 2015, we saw numerous local and national political figures rally around families that have been impacted by heroin overdoses and the heartbreaking loss of loved ones. Opioid addiction has finally come into focus within the mainstream media, and even current Presidential candidates have begun to address this as an important issue which commands attention and a solution.

More: Question and Answers on how methadone works

 

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Heroin, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Benefits, Methadone Blog, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Programs, Methadone Treatment, Opiate Treatment, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , | Comments Off on Expanding Access to Medication-Assisted Treatment

CVS Standing For Life and Safety

methadone-recovery-1It was announced late last month that CVS Drugstores intends to expand their provision of non-prescription naloxone into 12 additional U.S. States. Currently, they provide naloxone over-the-counter in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, but will begin offering the life-saving medication in California, Minnesota, Mississippi, Arkansas, Montana, New Jersey, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Utah, South Carolina, and Wisconsin.

Naloxone has gained attention in recent years due to its ability to reverse opioid overdoses. Over 44,000 people have died annually in the United States from drug overdose with a majority of those stemming from heroin or prescription pain medication. Naloxone has been successfully utilized in emergency rooms and on site in communities around the country reversing opioid overdose and saving thousands of lives.

It is critically important to recognize that people who have suffered with addiction are sometimes close to a lasting recovery. There is a popular expression used lately that is somewhat stark though true and thought-provoking. The expression goes “You can’t recover if you’re dead.” While this may sound off-putting to some, it reminds us that people stuck in years of painful addiction can, and do, change. We would much rather have naloxone readily available to save a life and to provide a son, daughter, or friend the opportunity to change direction.

An addicted individual could be much closer to choosing a life of recovery than we might imagine. This happens on a daily basis. How, and when, someone recovers from addiction is hard to predict. All we can do is to offer them an open door to a new and better life.

More Articles on Naloxone

Posted in Addiction Recovery, California Drug Treatment, Evzio, Heroin Overdose, Methadone, Methadone Overdose, Naloxone, Opiate Addiction, Prescription Drugs, Suboxone | Tagged | Comments Off on CVS Standing For Life and Safety

Heroin Said To Be Back With A Vengeance

stop-opioid-addictionChuck Rosenberg, the new chief of the Drug Enforcement Administration, has expressed serious concerns about the continuing opioid addiction problem in America and the pervasive spread of heroin addiction in particular.

A Fox News article highlighted Mr. Rosenberg’s discussion of how the USA represents only 5% of the world’s population – but consumes 95% of the world’s hydrocodone. His position is that rampant overprescribing of opioids has been occurring for years. As individuals become addicted to prescription medications and are then cut off from further prescription refills, many turn to the illegal purchase of street opiates.

“Street” opiates are sold at a premium – often more than people can afford. This leads to increased crime in order to support the expensive habit or turning to heroin since it is reported to only cost about 20% of hydrocodone on the black market.

The Fox article states that nearly 44,000 per year are dying from drug overdose and that half of those overdoses are from prescription medications. Casualty rates have almost doubled over the last few years.

Also in the news last week was an announcement from Hillary Clinton that if elected President she plans to dedicate billions to opioid treatment. There are other candidates as well, including governor Chris Christie, that have expressed a similar commitment to addressing the opioid addiction epidemic. The groundswell of concern regarding opioid addiction has gained momentum over the past 2 years and is now an audible siren capturing the attention of many governmental leaders. It has become a real health hazard that cannot be ignored any longer.

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Posted in Heroin, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Addiction, Suboxone, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Heroin Said To Be Back With A Vengeance