Santa Monica Suboxone Doctors

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A Santa Monica search reveals a moderate sized list of local doctors who can prescribe buprenorphine (suboxone) to individuals facing opiate withdrawal symptoms. Dependency on opioids results in a mix of painful withdrawal effects (insomnia, nausea, chills, diarrhea, body ache, and more) which generate chronic stress symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and a compromised ability to meet the demands of daily life. Buprenorphine is the therapeutic component in Suboxone that eliminates opiate withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone has become a well known and frequently sought opiate replacement medication that restores a person’s functioning following a period of active opioid addiction. Only authorized doctors are legally able to write prescriptions for buprenorphine/suboxone. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Santa Monica area residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.

Santa Monica Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Evelina L. Weinstein, M.D. 1315 Lincoln Blvd
Suite 250
Santa Monica, CA 90401
(310) 496-5505
Gary Chase, M.D. 315 18th Street
Santa Monica, CA 90402
(310) 394-7020
Brian Young Mclean, M.D. 723 Pacific Coast Highway
Santa Monica, CA 90402
(310) 899-0539
Marisa Chang, M.D. 2811 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 790
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 829-5968
David Leslie Fogelson, M.D. 2730 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 326
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 828-5015
Deborah S. Finklestein, M.D. 1821 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 311
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 582-5252
Solomon Perlo, M.D. 2730 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 650
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 828-0710
Robert Andries Shain, M.D. 1137 2nd Street
Unit 101
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 456-3503
Sheldon Emanuel Jordan, M.D. 2811 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 790
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 829-5968
Daniel Charles Minton, M.D. 2444 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 404
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(131) 045-3467
Terrance Procter Flanagan, M.D. 1138 9th Street Apt H
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(617) 504-2236
Edward J. Oconnor, M.D. 2811 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 790
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 829-5968
Arsalan Malik, M.D. 2730 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 630
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(424) 259-2673
Eric M. Wexler, M.D. 2730 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 325
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 744-5102
Soroya Bacchus 2730 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 660
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 829-4640
Robert S. Martin, M.D. 2811 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 620
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 828-4944
Orlando Cartaya, M.D. 2444 Wilshire Boulevard
Unit 620
Santa Monica, CA 90403
(310) 315-1018
Mona Q. Cho, M.D. 1304 15th Street
Suite 202
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 393-0739
Emmanuel Emenike 1260 15th Street
Suite #1414
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 869-0638
Hossein Babaali, M.D. 2428 Santa Monica Boulevard
Suite 402
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 829-3385
Brent James Michael, M.D. 2001 Santa Monica Boulevard
Suite 1260-W
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 829-7777
Marc Brodsky, M.D. UCLA Center for East- West Medicine
2428 Santa Monica Boulevard Unit # 208
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 998-9118
Gerald M. Sacks, M.D. 2020 Santa Monica Boulevard
Suite 150
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 264-7314
Keith Gregory Heinzerling, M.D. UCLA Les Kelly Family Health Center
1920 Colorado Avenue
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(866) 449-8252
Manali Ayachit Shendrikar, M.D. 2001 Santa Monica Boulevard
Suite 380W
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 586-9002
Joseph Knotz, M.D. 1304 15th Street
Suite 202
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 937-0739
Martin Alpert, M.D. 1304 15th Street
Suite 202
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 393-0739
Oscar J. Hernandez, M.D. 2001 Santa Monica Boulevard
Suite 680
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 453-0419
Paul M. Robinson, M.D. 2915 Santa Monica Boulevard
Unit 2
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 828-3031
Thomas K. Ciesla, M.D. 1301 20th Street
Suite 212
Santa Monica, CA 90404
(310) 315-0300
Scott David Reiter, M.D. 3010 Lincoln Boulevard
Santa Monica, CA 90405
(310) 399-9142
Jeanne Axler, M.D. 3205 Ocean Park Boulevard
Unit 250
Santa Monica, CA 90405
(310) 452-8345

What Is Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an opioid treatment medication that works very differently than either methadone or buprenorphine.

Naltrexone functions as an opioid blocker that interferes with the euphoric effects of opiates. Unlike methadone, naltrexone does not eliminate opioid withdrawal. So it is typically only begun following a successful period of opioid detoxification.

Naltrexone is taken as a pill or as a time-released injectable. It blocks the feeling of getting high thus deterring a person from continuing in active drug use with opioids. If there’s no pay off for using, why do it?

Some individuals who don’t necessarily require methadone or buprenorphine can effectively utilize naltrexone as a component of their recovery program. Vivitrol is the time-released, branded version of naltrexone that is taken once monthly as an injection. With Vivitrol, the naltrexone remains active in the bloodstream for 30 days and blocks the effects of heroin or other opiate use. This reinforces one’s focus on recovery choices and can reduce opioid cravings.

Patients receiving naltrexone may develop a lowered tolerance to opioids over time, and should remain aware of the risk of opioid overdose should they relapse. The medication is also used in the treatment of alcohol dependency and has been shown to reduce the euphoric effects of alcohol consumption.

Naltrexone is not to be confused with Naloxone. Naloxone is the opioid overdose reversal medication that has recently been in the news for saving thousands of lives across the country.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Drug Treatment, Methadone Clinics, Naltrexone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Vivitrol | Comments Off on What Is Naltrexone

Billions To Be Allocated In Fight Against Opioid Crisis

The national budget proposal for the 2019 fiscal year includes a request for $13 billion in funding for opioid treatment and related services. This linked Newsweek article states that $3 billion would be allocated in 2018 and another $10 billion in 2019.

Many opioid treatment programs across the country are currently able to add patient slots when additional funding is made available. The opioid crisis has flooded many clinics that are already at maximum census due to limited State and Medicaid funding.

A number of private pay clinics have opened in recent years as the need for medication-assisted treatment increased. If a substantial allocation of government funds becomes available, opioid treatment services will finally come into sharp national focus as scores of people finally obtain the help they need to stabilize and to recover.

In treating opioid addiction, research has shown that traditional abstinence-based programs which do not utilize medication assistance have a failure rate of 90%. Medication-assistance is a critical factor in helping opioid addicted people move into sustained recovery. The proposed $13 billion earmarked for opioid treatment services can make a huge difference all across the U.S. Methadone or buprenorphine (suboxone) coupled with counseling and drug testing comprise the gold standard of care in treating opioid addiction.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Buprenorphine, Drug Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Benefits, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone News, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors | Comments Off on Billions To Be Allocated In Fight Against Opioid Crisis

Opioid Treatment Making A Difference

There is a great article in the Bismarck Tribune about the expansion of methadone services in Fargo, North Dakota. Fargo, like most other areas of the country, was impacted in recent years by numerous opioid-related overdose deaths.

The article reports that Cass County had 31 overdose deaths in 2016, but that number was reduced to 15 in 2017, due in part to the increased availability of naloxone (the medication that reverses opioid overdose).

While local ambulance calls have decreased in relation to opioid overdoses, the problem of opioid addiction remains a widespread and primary concern in the community.

The Tribune story reveals that more local residents are now enrolled in opioid treatment and are receiving the life-saving medication, methadone. Treatment that combines medication-assistance and counseling is the industry standard in quality care for those addicted to opioids.

The new Fargo-based clinic is reported to have 164 active patients currently enrolled in the methadone program. The clinic director, Mark Schaefer, is quoted as saying that while enrollment has been rapid, there remain many people in the local area with untreated opioid addiction.

The availability of treatment is making a difference. And medications like methadone, buprenorphine, and naloxone are providing a much needed solution to America’s opioid crisis.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Buprenorphine, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Naloxone, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Opioid Treatment Making A Difference

Shifting Tide Favors Medication in Opioid Treatment

The nation’s opioid epidemic has reached fever pitch and is now being spotlighted by all levels of local and national media. This is obviously good news.

At the center of this discussion is what can be done to reduce opioid fatalities, and to provide addicted people a real opportunity to regain control over their lives. This discussion inevitably leads to examining the benefit of medication-assisted treatment.

Methadone and buprenorphine are the two leading alternatives for helping patients deal with the perpetual withdrawal sickness that comes from a physiological dependency on opioids. Naloxone is a medication used to reverse opioid overdose.

In recent congressional testimony to members of Congress, Scott Gottlieb (Commissioner of the FDA) specifically heralded the life-saving benefits of methadone and similar medications.

His testimony included comments on the wealth of information behind the effectiveness of medication-assisted treatment. It is vitally important that legislative decision-makers obtain a clear understanding about what works and what does not in regard to coping successfully with this opioid crisis.

Time is of the essence because the present overdose fatality rate in the United States is over 64,000 per year. This number is beyond alarming. Here is an article that points to a possible positive shift in communities’ openness to having local opioid treatment nearby. Hopefully, this becomes a trend.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Naloxone, Opiate Addiction, Recovery, Suboxone | Comments Off on Shifting Tide Favors Medication in Opioid Treatment