Boston Suboxone Doctors


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Boston can accommodate treatment for many area individuals attempting to cope with an opioid addiction. Boston has numerous physicians who can provide prescriptions for buprenorphine, which is the active ingredient in suboxone that eliminates opioid withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone has emerged in recent years as a popular alternative to methadone that usually provides complete relief for those people experiencing a moderate degree of opioid withdrawal. More extensive opioid addictions are sometimes better treated with methadone. However, suboxone should be considered as an option if opioid replacement therapy is medically justified for a patient’s opiate addiction. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Boston area residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.



Boston Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Michael Allen Dekker, D.O. 251 Causeway Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 248-1000
Gregory Acampora, M.D. Massachusetts General Hospital
West End Clinic
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 726-2712
Curtis Wittmann, M.D. 50 Staniford South
Suite 580
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 643-6139
Carlos Manuel Suarez, M.D. 16 Blossom Street
R101
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 724-4905
Lily A. Awad, M.D. VAOPC 251 Causeway Street
2nd Floor
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 248-1054
Karsten D. Kueppenbender, M.D. Massachusetts General Hospital
West End House
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 726-2712
Emine Nalan Ward, M.D. MGH-West End Clinic
16 blossom Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 661-5700
Duy Pham, M.D. 251 Causeway Street
Suite 245
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 248-1016
Katherine Knutson, M.D. MOH Department of Psychiatry
WACC 812, 15 Parkman Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 724-6300×134
James Niels Rosenquist, M.D. Mass General Hospital
55 Fruit Street – WACC 815
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 724-6300
Feyza Marouf, M.D. 55 Fruit Street
Warren 1220
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 643-6360
Shamim Nejad, M.D. MGH- Warren 615
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 726-2984
Jonathan Raymond Moran, M.D. MGH
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 726-2000
John David Matthews, M.D. Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street, Warren 1220
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 724-9144
Elliott B. Martin, Jr., M.D. Children's Hospital Boston
300 Longwood Avenue-Fegan 8
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 355-6680
John R. Peteet, M.D. BWH, Dept. of Psychiatry
75 Francis Street
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 278-0438
Natalija Bogdanovic, M.D. Children's Hospital Boston
300 Longwood Avenue ,Fegan 8
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 355-6680
Edward Wright Boyer, M.D. CHILDRENS HOSPITAL
300 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 355-6000
John R. Knight, M.D. Adolescent Substance Abuse Program
Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 355-2727
Joji Suzuki, M.D. Brigham and Women's Hospital
75 Francis Street
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 732-6701
John F. Sullivan, M.D. 221 Longwood Avenue
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 732-6753
Lusha Liu, M.D. 114 The Fenway
Apartment 14
Boston, MA 02115
(651) 492-8022
Amy Pearsall, M.D. 255 Massachusetts Avenue
Unit #217
Boston, MA 02115
(646) 483-8709
Amy Pearsall, M.D. 255 Massachusetts Avenue
Unit #217
Boston, MA 02115
(646) 483-8709
Hung K. Do, M.D. 105 Newbury Street
Suite 4
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 800-0989
Claudia Pucci, M.D. 268 Newbury Street, 3rd Floor
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 792-3683
Snezana Milanovic, M.D. 20 Park Plaza
Suite 442
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 948-2110
Lawrence Litman, M.D. 264 Beacon Street
5th Floor
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 424-6949
Alireza Toossi, M.D. 425 Boylston Street
Suite 310
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 848-3948
Michael William Marcus, M.D. 82 Marlborough Street
Boston, MA 02116
(781) 721-2737
Mark Austin Howard, M.D. One Boston Medical Center Place
Dowling 7
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 638-6565×39461
Jane Liebschutz, M.D. Boston Medical Center
725 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6929
Thokozeni Lipato, M.D. 729 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-5090
Kelley Saia, M.D. Boston Medical Center
85 East Concord Street, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-4165
Matthew I. Joslyn 780 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
(781) 221-6565
Claire Carlo, M.D. Boston Health Care for the Homeless
780 Albany St.
Boston, MA 02118
(857) 654-1600
Daniel P. Alford, M.D. Boston Medical Center
91 E. Concord Street, Suite 200
Boston, MA 02118
(866) 414-6926
Eugene Uzogara, M.D. 850 Harrison Avenue
Dowling, 8th Floor
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-5081
Carol Waldmann, M.D. Boston Health Care for the Homeless
729 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston, MA 02118
(781) 221-6565
Michelle J. Sia, D.O. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
85 East Concord Street, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-4165
Ashwin Mamidi Reddy Boston Medical Center
850 Harrison Avenue, Dowling Building 7S
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6565×39487
Ashwini Nadkarni, M.D. 715 Albany Street
Dowling Building, 8th Floor 75
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 638-6565
David G. Munson, M.D. Boston Health Care for the Homeless Prg
780 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
(857) 654-1042
Sarah Mary Bagley, M.D. 801 Mass Aveune
Crosstown 2, GIM
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6906
Esther Valdez, M.D. Boston Health Care for the Homeless
780 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6926
Sheila E. Chapman, M.D. Boston Medical Center
ACC 5 N-10, 850 Harrison Avenue
Boston, MA 02118
(866) 414-6926
Jason M. Worcester, M.D. Boston Medical Center
725 Albany Street, Unit 5C
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6926
Jeffrey H. Samet, M.D.,M.A.,M.P.H. Boston Medical Center
801 Massachusetts Avenue, 2nd Floor
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6926
James J. O'Connell, M.D. Boston Health Care for the Homeless Prog
780 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
(857) 654-1006
Theresa W. Kim, M.D. Boston Medical Center
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6926
Sean R. Stetson, M.D. 150 South Huntington Avenue
Unit 116A
Boston, MA 02130
(857) 364-4119
John A. Fromson, M.D. Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital
1153 Centre Street
Boston, MA 02130
(617) 983-7060
Anthony E. Raynes, M.D. Arbour Hospital
49 Robinwood Avenue, Jamaica Plain
Boston, MA 02130
(617) 390-1204
Joji Suzuki, M.D. Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital
1153 Centre Street
Boston, MA 02130
(617) 983-7060
Ilan Philip Goldberg, M.D. 330 Brookline Avenue
Rabb 2
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 667-2300


Shifting Tide Favors Medication in Opioid Treatment

The nation’s opioid epidemic has reached fever pitch and is now being spotlighted by all levels of local and national media. This is obviously good news.

At the center of this discussion is what can be done to reduce opioid fatalities, and to provide addicted people a real opportunity to regain control over their lives. This discussion inevitably leads to examining the benefit of medication-assisted treatment.

Methadone, buprenorphine, and naloxone are the three leading alternatives for helping patients deal with the perpetual withdrawal sickness that comes from a physiological dependency on opioids.

In recent congressional testimony to members of Congress, Scott Gottlieb (Commissioner of the FDA) specifically heralded the life-saving benefits of methadone and similar medications.

His testimony included comments on the wealth of information behind the effectiveness of medication-assisted treatment. It is vitally important that legislative decision-makers obtain a clear understanding about what works and what does not in regard to coping successfully with this opioid crisis.

Time is of the essence because the present overdose fatality rate in the United States is over 64,000 per year. This number is beyond alarming. Here is an article that points to a possible positive shift in communities’ openness to having local opioid treatment nearby. Hopefully, this becomes a trend.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Naloxone, Opiate Addiction, Recovery, Suboxone | Comments Off on Shifting Tide Favors Medication in Opioid Treatment

Achieving Stability in the Recovery Process

Opioid addiction is one of the more challenging substance use disorders to confront and manage because of its physical dependency characteristics. Once the process of physical addiction has taken hold, avoiding daily withdrawal becomes a high hurdle.

Because of this daily dilemma, it becomes difficult to remain focused on other aspects of recovery. It’s the law of “first things first” that applies when tackling any problem. There is a natural order and sequence which must be followed when trying to solve a complex task. Opioid addiction recovery is no exception.

Obtaining relief from opioid withdrawal symptoms is a very important first step in addressing opioid addiction. This is why medication-assisted treatment is specifically identified as a medical best practice. Science and years of exhaustive research have proven (not just suggested) that treatment coupled with medication-assistance offers the greatest probability of long-term success when trying to overcome moderate to severe opioid addiction.

Fortunately, more people are becoming aware of the need for buprenorphine, methadone, and other medications that can play a vital role in stabilizing an opioid addicted individual at the onset of their personal recovery.

Historically, efforts to come off of opioids in a detox setting have been often unsuccessful because many detoxes used insufficient medications to alleviate withdrawal symptoms. Consequently, patients would typically begin to get sick in 1-2 days with their withdrawal symptoms becoming intolerable. This can lead to patients abandoning the detox effort and a quick return to illicit opiates.

However, the tide is turning. As the American opioid crisis continues to impact families and U.S. society, many more physicians, lawmakers, and government representatives are gaining a quick education on the enormous value of medication-assisted treatment. Methadone is at the forefront of this new awareness as is buprenorphine-based products like Suboxone.

Appropriate medications used responsibly and under a doctor’s supervision provide stability, hope, and opportunity.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Buprenorphine, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Opiate Addiction, Recovery, Recovery Support, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , | Comments Off on Achieving Stability in the Recovery Process

Methadone Availability

Imagine trying to medically manage advanced diabetes with no insulin or grand mal seizures without anticonvulsant medication.

Modern medicine has raised our standard of living and sustained life in ways that people could not have imagined just 100 years ago.

In the cases cited above of diabetes and epilepsy, medication functions as a miracle intervention that saves the patient from suffering and death, and allows him or her to lead a full and productive life.

Science is clearly instructing us that addiction is a treatable illness which can at times be successfully managed with medication assistance, similar to the stabilizing role that insulin plays in the life of the diabetic patient.

A critical element of opioid addiction is the physical dependency which leads to debilitating opioid withdrawal symptoms. For many individuals, the persistence and severity of opioid withdrawal leads them to chronic failure in any effort to recover. With the assistance of methadone (or buprenorphine), many of these people will finally be able to cope with their illness by having their withdrawal symptoms alleviated.

The value of relief from opioid withdrawal is monumental. It is often the first major step toward being able to face one’s addiction. Medication assistance is good science, and it opens a door that was likely closed for many years. The value of having a new start is priceless. We only have one life. It is worth saving. Whether it’s diabetes, epilepsy, heart disease, or addiction – specific medications can help a patient restore their quality of life.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone News, Methadone Programs, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Methadone Availability

Right Path Treatment Centers

Right Path provide a variety of opioid, alcohol, and other drug addiction treatment services through their various outpatient programs located in Virginia and North Carolina.

The organization utilizes Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorders, and they provide confidential consultation to individuals who are trying to determine the best of course of treatment for dealing with their addiction issues. Right Path are equipped to now provide the new Probuphine implant that utilizes time-released buprenorphine to alleviate opioid withdrawal symptoms as individuals pursue a solid, long-term personal recovery.

Right Path endorse the benefits of 12 Step philosophy while also incorporating a strong medical component in their opioid recovery program due to the statistically high percentage of opioid addicted people who will ultimately relapse without medication-assisted support.

Read more about Right Path’s services and counseling approach at the link above.

Posted in Addiction Counseling, Addiction Recovery, Buprenorphine, Methadone, Opiate Treatment, Recovery, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , | Comments Off on Right Path Treatment Centers