Boston Suboxone Doctors


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Boston can accommodate treatment for many area individuals attempting to cope with an opioid addiction. Boston has numerous physicians who can provide prescriptions for buprenorphine, which is the active ingredient in suboxone that eliminates opioid withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone has emerged in recent years as a popular alternative to methadone that usually provides complete relief for those people experiencing a moderate degree of opioid withdrawal. More extensive opioid addictions are sometimes better treated with methadone. However, suboxone should be considered as an option if opioid replacement therapy is medically justified for a patient’s opiate addiction. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Boston area residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.



Boston Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Michael Allen Dekker, D.O. 251 Causeway Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 248-1000
Gregory Acampora, M.D. Massachusetts General Hospital
West End Clinic
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 726-2712
Curtis Wittmann, M.D. 50 Staniford South
Suite 580
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 643-6139
Carlos Manuel Suarez, M.D. 16 Blossom Street
R101
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 724-4905
Lily A. Awad, M.D. VAOPC 251 Causeway Street
2nd Floor
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 248-1054
Karsten D. Kueppenbender, M.D. Massachusetts General Hospital
West End House
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 726-2712
Emine Nalan Ward, M.D. MGH-West End Clinic
16 blossom Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 661-5700
Duy Pham, M.D. 251 Causeway Street
Suite 245
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 248-1016
Katherine Knutson, M.D. MOH Department of Psychiatry
WACC 812, 15 Parkman Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 724-6300×134
James Niels Rosenquist, M.D. Mass General Hospital
55 Fruit Street – WACC 815
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 724-6300
Feyza Marouf, M.D. 55 Fruit Street
Warren 1220
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 643-6360
Shamim Nejad, M.D. MGH- Warren 615
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 726-2984
Jonathan Raymond Moran, M.D. MGH
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 726-2000
John David Matthews, M.D. Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street, Warren 1220
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 724-9144
Elliott B. Martin, Jr., M.D. Children's Hospital Boston
300 Longwood Avenue-Fegan 8
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 355-6680
John R. Peteet, M.D. BWH, Dept. of Psychiatry
75 Francis Street
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 278-0438
Natalija Bogdanovic, M.D. Children's Hospital Boston
300 Longwood Avenue ,Fegan 8
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 355-6680
Edward Wright Boyer, M.D. CHILDRENS HOSPITAL
300 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 355-6000
John R. Knight, M.D. Adolescent Substance Abuse Program
Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 355-2727
Joji Suzuki, M.D. Brigham and Women's Hospital
75 Francis Street
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 732-6701
John F. Sullivan, M.D. 221 Longwood Avenue
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 732-6753
Lusha Liu, M.D. 114 The Fenway
Apartment 14
Boston, MA 02115
(651) 492-8022
Amy Pearsall, M.D. 255 Massachusetts Avenue
Unit #217
Boston, MA 02115
(646) 483-8709
Amy Pearsall, M.D. 255 Massachusetts Avenue
Unit #217
Boston, MA 02115
(646) 483-8709
Hung K. Do, M.D. 105 Newbury Street
Suite 4
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 800-0989
Claudia Pucci, M.D. 268 Newbury Street, 3rd Floor
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 792-3683
Snezana Milanovic, M.D. 20 Park Plaza
Suite 442
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 948-2110
Lawrence Litman, M.D. 264 Beacon Street
5th Floor
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 424-6949
Alireza Toossi, M.D. 425 Boylston Street
Suite 310
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 848-3948
Michael William Marcus, M.D. 82 Marlborough Street
Boston, MA 02116
(781) 721-2737
Mark Austin Howard, M.D. One Boston Medical Center Place
Dowling 7
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 638-6565
Jane Liebschutz, M.D. Boston Medical Center
725 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6929
Thokozeni Lipato, M.D. 729 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-5090
Kelley Saia, M.D. Boston Medical Center
85 East Concord Street, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-4165
Matthew I. Joslyn 780 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
(781) 221-6565
Claire Carlo, M.D. Boston Health Care for the Homeless
780 Albany St.
Boston, MA 02118
(857) 654-1600
Daniel P. Alford, M.D. Boston Medical Center
91 E. Concord Street, Suite 200
Boston, MA 02118
(866) 414-6926
Eugene Uzogara, M.D. 850 Harrison Avenue
Dowling, 8th Floor
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-5081
Carol Waldmann, M.D. Boston Health Care for the Homeless
729 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston, MA 02118
(781) 221-6565
Michelle J. Sia, D.O. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
85 East Concord Street, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-4165
Ashwin Mamidi Reddy Boston Medical Center
850 Harrison Avenue, Dowling Building 7S
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6565×39487
Ashwini Nadkarni, M.D. 715 Albany Street
Dowling Building, 8th Floor 75
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 638-6565
David G. Munson, M.D. Boston Health Care for the Homeless Prg
780 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
(857) 654-1042
Sarah Mary Bagley, M.D. 801 Mass Aveune
Crosstown 2, GIM
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6906
Esther Valdez, M.D. Boston Health Care for the Homeless
780 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6926
Sheila E. Chapman, M.D. Boston Medical Center
ACC 5 N-10, 850 Harrison Avenue
Boston, MA 02118
(866) 414-6926
Jason M. Worcester, M.D. Boston Medical Center
725 Albany Street, Unit 5C
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6926
Jeffrey H. Samet, M.D.,M.A.,M.P.H. Boston Medical Center
801 Massachusetts Avenue, 2nd Floor
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6926
James J. O'Connell, M.D. Boston Health Care for the Homeless Prog
780 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
(857) 654-1006
Theresa W. Kim, M.D. Boston Medical Center
Boston, MA 02118
(617) 414-6926
Sean R. Stetson, M.D. 150 South Huntington Avenue
Unit 116A
Boston, MA 02130
(857) 364-4119
John A. Fromson, M.D. Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital
1153 Centre Street
Boston, MA 02130
(617) 983-7060
Anthony E. Raynes, M.D. Arbour Hospital
49 Robinwood Avenue, Jamaica Plain
Boston, MA 02130
(617) 390-1204
Joji Suzuki, M.D. Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital
1153 Centre Street
Boston, MA 02130
(617) 983-7060
Ilan Philip Goldberg, M.D. 330 Brookline Avenue
Rabb 2
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 667-2300


Social Support in Opioid Treatment

The need for social support in recovery is a significant factor. Not only is successful recovery an ongoing challenge, but it is a journey which is greatly helped through positive connection with others.

Others who offer acceptance and encouragement during “rough days” can sometimes make the difference between relapse and successful coping.

It is important to realize that support can come from anyone. It does not necessarily have to be one’s family or from the 12 Step community. The love, support, and involvement of others in your recovery can actually come from a much wider variety of contacts and positive influences.

It’s particularly beneficial when your supports are accepting of medication-assisted treatment. Physicians and counselors are generally much better informed on the benefits of methadone or buprenorphine in managing opioid withdrawal. If your spouse, partner, or friend does not understand the value of medication-assistance, it can make a difference to invite them to one of your counseling sessions or to direct them to this website.

Opioid treatment programs (like the ones featured on Methadone.US) generally offer group therapy, individual counseling, and education sessions where other patients can offer support. Some programs also provide assistance for coping with psychiatric issues like anxiety, depression, PTSD, or bipolar disorder. Managing these co-occurring disorders is really key in strengthening your overall recovery from opioids or other drugs.

Always remember, addiction is an illness that grows in darkness & isolation. So step out into the light. Seek professional help and support. This is where solutions begin. There are others who will walk with you on the path of recovery. If you feel stuck in addiction presently, that is temporary. That can change.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opioid Treatment, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics, Suboxone Doctors | Comments Off on Social Support in Opioid Treatment

Acadia Healthcare Opioid Use Disorder Programs

Acadia Healthcare is one of America’s leading psychiatric and chemical dependency treatment providers. Headquartered in Franklin Tennessee, the company operates an extensive network of behavioral health facilities many of which focus specifically on the treatment of opioid use disorder.

Acadia’s CTC (Comprehensive Treatment Center) clinics specialize in helping patients who are struggling with an opioid addiction. Across Acadia’s network the company employees over 20,000 staff who serve about 70,000 patients on a daily basis.

Acadia’s dedicated CTC clinics utilize the best practice medication-assisted treatment (MAT) model which aims to stabilize patients using FDA-approved medications. These medications include methadone, buprenorphine, suboxone, and vivitrol.

Medication management allows Acadia patients to successfully ease their distressing withdrawal symptoms such that long-lasting addiction recovery can be established.

Because addiction can be a very individualized experience from one person to the next, Acadia’s treatment staff strive to individualize each patient’s treatment plan in a commitment to help each person meet their personal recovery goals.

Featured here on Methadone.US are 148 CTC clinics that Acadia provide across the United States. Feel free to browse Acadia’s network to locate a treatment facility near you, and make a new start! A great quote that we believe in goes like this “Today is the first day of the rest of your life”.

Posted in Acadia Healthcare, Addiction Recovery, Addiction Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics | Comments Off on Acadia Healthcare Opioid Use Disorder Programs

The Mindset for Recovery

It’s no secret that many addicted people resist recovery or treatment, sometimes for years, before eventually deciding to make a change. The mental stress of addiction often paralyzes a person with fear and indecision.

Making a commitment to change can be intimidating, even scary. But many people who enter treatment look back and say “Why didn’t I do this sooner!”

What that tells us is that treatment and support actually work. Particularly medication-assisted treatment (MAT) like that which is typically provided to those trying to overcome years of opioid addiction.

The mindset for recovery begins with an openness and a willingness to try something new. To reach out for guidance. There are many stories of addiction where the individual cuts ties with family and friends, and retreats into isolation. This makes people sicker … and stuck. Often times, “stuck” is a self-imposed but temporary state of mind.

The mindset for recovery is picking up the phone and calling your local treatment center, or a counselor, doctor, or even a friend to say “I’m ready for help”. Every day is an opportunity to reset, and to go in a new direction. We are not promised an unlimited number of days. So don’t procrastinate.

Opioid addiction can be pretty relentless. But you do not have to face it alone. Methadone, suboxone, buprenorphine, vivitrol are supportive medications that make the journey easier. For many people, these medications have opened the door to recovery. And for many, it has saved their lives.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Addiction Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opioid Treatment, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors | Comments Off on The Mindset for Recovery

Faces of Recovery

The faces of recovery are as diverse as you can imagine. Decades ago, there were common stereotypes of addicts as people who looked a certain way and likely came from a shady side of the tracks.

Today, we now understand that addiction has impacted nearly every family and community across the country. It has crept into mainstream life to such a large extent that the old stereotypes have faded away, and in their place are pictures of everyday people like the ones we know and love.

Opioid addiction is an illness that can be successfully treated. This new reality provides hope and assurance that nearly any person, with proper support and treatment, can successfully manage this illness and regain their life.

However, the odds are not good for individuals who stay in active addiction and who postpone their entry into professional care. With the widespread proliferation of fentanyl and other adulterated street opiates, the risks have never been greater.

In the United States, there are a significant number of methadone clinics, buprenorphine clinics, and qualified physicians who specialize in the treatment of opioid addition using medication-assisted approaches. For the vast majority of opioid addicted people, medication is key in helping them to prevent extremely diffcult opioid withdrawal.

Once withdrawal sickness is effectively eliminated, then counseling & support can help restore a person’s life and open up new paths to the future.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Buprenorphine, Drug Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Benefits, Methadone Clinics, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Faces of Recovery