Baltimore Suboxone Doctors

Ideal Option

Ideal Option – Catonsville
516 N. Rolling Road – Suite 301
Baltimore, MD 21237

Ideal Option – Rosedale
19 Fontana Lane – Suite 108
Rosedale, MD 21237

Phone: (877) 522-1275
Website: www.idealoption.net

Hours of Operation
Clinic Hours: Monday – Thursday, 9:30am – 5:30pm
Scheduling/Call Center: 7:00am – 11:00pm

Ideal Option sets out to ensure that Baltimore individuals receive the individualized care they deserve. Ideal Option is an outpatient Premier Suboxone / Buprenorphine Program that is accepting New Patients in Baltimore RIGHT NOW. Ideal Option accepts insurance – including Medicaid/Beacon Health and will work with YOUR schedule and YOUR financial situation to develop a treatment plan that is right for YOU.

Contact Ideal Option – (877) 522-1275

 

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Baltimore has experienced a substantial opioid addiction problem like many other larger metropolitan cities in the United States. Opioid dependency has been on the rise for more than a decade with much of it tied not only to heroin use but also to the proliferation of prescription pain medications. Baltimore provides an ample supply of qualified physicians who are approved to write prescriptions for suboxone. Suboxone is a legitimate and effective alternative for helping to eliminate opioid withdrawal symptoms for a majority of addicted persons. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Baltimore area residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.



Baltimore Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Ideal Option – Catonsville 516 N. Rolling Road – Suite 301
Baltimore, MD 21237
(877) 522-1275
Ideal Option – Rosedale 19 Fontana Lane – Suite 108
Baltimore, MD 21237
(877) 522-1275
Pine Heights Treatment Center 3455 Wilkens Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21229
(410) 983-3872
Shana Gage, M.D. University of Maryland- 110 S Paca St.
Div. of Drug & Alch Abuse- 4th Fl 04-019
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 328-1834
Vishal Sethi, M.D. 1001 Cathederal Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 837-2050
Inai M. Mkandawire, D.O. 8415 Bellona Lane
Suite 201
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 821-7775×222
Kiran Iqbal, M.D. University of Maryland
701 West Pratt Street, 4th Floor
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 328-3522
Kofi Owusu- Antwi, M.D. 827 Linden Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 225-8000
Meredith Anne Johnston, M.D. Health Care for the Homeless
421 Fallsway
Baltimore, MD 21201
(443) 703-1106
Maria Carolina Haine, M.D. University of Maryland Hospital
22 S. Greene St. 12th floor #s-12A06
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 328-8330
Eduardo R. Leon Guerrero, M.D. Chase Brexton Health Services, Inc.
1111 North Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 837-2050×2617
Enrique B. Olivares, M.D. 821 North Eutaw Street
Suite 413
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 462-5767
Adela Valadez-Meltzer, M.D. Baltimore VA Medical Center
10 North Greene Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 605-7000ext361
Adam L. Glushakow, M.D. 22 Greene Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 389-0725
Ramin Mazhari, M.D. HCH
111 Park Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 837-5533
Purcell George Bailey, Jr., M.D. 1800 North Charles Street
Suite 100
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 493-4177
Karla Y. Sanchez, M.D. 1001 Cathedral Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 752-0954
Leonard Anang Sowah, M.D. 111 Park Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 837-5533
Curtis N. Adams, Jr., M.D. 630 West Fayette Street
4 East
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 328-2564
Anna Baskina, M.D. Univ of MD, Psychiatr Emergency Services
22 S. Greene Street, Room WGL 317
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 328-1219
Theodora George Balis, M.D. UMMS
701 W Pratt/ 630 W Fayette/19 S Eutaw
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 328-2564
Jill A. Rachbeisel, M.D. Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine
701 West Pratt Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 328-5161
Gregory Wayne Ross 15 Charles Plaza
Suite 101B
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 685-8665
John M. McDonald, M.D. VA Medical Center, Mental Health
10 North Greene Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 605-7425
Donald Lynn Thompson, M.D. University of Maryland Psychiatry Dept.
701 West Pratt Street, Room 596
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 328-1108
Steven Corvilla, M.D. 821North Eutah Street
Suite 305
Baltimore, MD 21201
(443) 982-9036
Michael Hayes, M.D. 827 Linden Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 225-8240
Christopher John Welsh, M.D. 22 S. Greene Street, P-1-H-10 Box 349
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 328-6106
Daniel R. Howard, M.D. 405 North Paca Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 779-9609
Catherine Maslen, M.D. Chase Brexton Health Services
1001 Cathedral Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 837-2050
Joseph G. Liberto, M.D. VA Maryland Health Care System
10 North Greene St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 605-7368
Todd Matthew Augustus, M.D. 401 East Eager Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 209-4001
Gary S. Friedman, M.D. Family Health Centers of Baltimore
315 North Calvert Street Fourth Floor
Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 500-5600
Robert Cadogan, M.D. 11 East Mt. Royal Avenue
The Towne Building, Lower Level
Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 347-3000
Ramin Mazhari, M.D. Health care for the Homeless
421 The Falssway
Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 837-5533
Janice Ryden, M.D. East Baltimore Medical Center
1000 East Eager Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 522-9800
Michele Henley, M.D. 1235 East Monument Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 327-5100×114
Elizabeth Adrienne Stuller, M.D. 10 East Lee Street
Suite 2409
Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 530-3522
Fred S. Berlin, M.D. 104 East Biddle Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 539-1661
Leslie R. Donohue, M.D. Jai Medical Center
1235 East Monument Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 327-5700
Marilyn Lydia Martin, M.D. 7801 York Road
Suite 215
Baltimore, MD 21204
(410) 337-7772
Ruth A. Richter, M.D. 7801 York Road
Baltimore, MD 21204
(410) 337-7772
Lynn Staggs, M.D. Ruxton Towers
8415 Bellona Lane, Suite 204
Baltimore, MD 21204
(410) 821-7775
Robert Ciaverelli, M.D. 6525 North Charles Street
Gibson Building, Suite 135
Baltimore, MD 21204
(410) 823-5619
F. Caroline Define, M.D. Greater Baltimore Medical Center
6701 North Charles Street, Suite 4105
Baltimore, MD 21204
(410) 227-7149
Patricia S. Roy, M.D. 550 North Broadway
Suite 305
Baltimore, MD 21205
(410) 955-2295
Luke Elhanan Johnsen, M.D. Eastern STD Clinic – BCHD
620 North Caroline Street
Baltimore, MD 21205
(410) 396-9410
Purcell George Bailey, Jr., M.D. 6660 Belair Road
Baltimore, MD 21206
(410) 493-4177
Myun-Ki Kim, M.D. 6326 Selursky Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21207
(410) 277-8910
Cornell J. Shelton, M.D. St. Agnes Hospital Department of Rehab
900 Caton Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21208
(410) 368-2802
Neil Eric Warres, M.D. 104 Church Lane
Suite 202
Baltimore, MD 21208
(410) 484-0989
Sheldon D. Glass, M.D. 3635 Old Court Rd.
Baltimore, MD 21208
(410) 484-2700
Nkiruka U. Arene, M.D. 1305 West Old Cold Spring Lane
Baltimore, MD 21209
(443) 977-9180
Gladys Arak, M.D. 2208 Arden Road
Baltimore, MD 21209
(410) 542-9680
Lisa A. Keamy, M.D. Adult Medicine Specialists
6080 Falls Road, Suite 204
Baltimore, MD 21209
(410) 323-2757
Martin Julian Brandes, M.D. 501 West University Parkway
Apt CC2
Baltimore, MD 21210
(410) 243-2390
Anil Uberoi, M.D. 4419 Falls Road
Suite A
Baltimore, MD 21211
(410) 366-1101
Marilyn Lydia Martin, M.D. 711 West 40th Street
Suite 406, The Rotunda
Baltimore, MD 21211
(410) 433-4373
Lee Edwin Gresser, M.D. 6671 Walnutwood Circle
Baltimore, MD 21212
(410) 377-2331
Stephanie Lynn Davis, M.D. Peoples Community Health Center
5225 York Road
Baltimore, MD 21212
(410) 467-6040
David C. Silver, M.D. Highlandtown Community Health Center
3509 Eastern Av.
Baltimore, MD 21212
(410) 558-4721
Lawrence Louis Rubin, M.D. 2511 Edmondson Highway
Baltimore, MD 21213
(410) 675-4500
Karen Marie Donaldson, M.D. Baltimore Medical System
3120 Erdman Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21213
(410) 558-4800
Shivani Myer, M.D. 3101 Towanda Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21215
(214) 316-6596
Roman Ostrovsky, M.D. 6615 Reisterstown Road
Suite 109
Baltimore, MD 21215
(443) 803-4578
Sylvanus Osomoba Oyogoa, M.D. 2411 West Belveders
Suite 302
Baltimore, MD 21215
(410) 542-1722
David Lewis Shevitz, MD. Sinai Hospital of Baltimore
2401 West Belvedere
Baltimore, MD 21215
(410) 363-2845
Maria Lourdes Castineira Garcia, M.D. 701 West Pratt Street
Baltimore, MD 21215
(410) 328-1815
Baltimore Suboxone Services

Pine Heights Treatment Center

Pine Heights Treatment Center
3455 Wilkens Ave., Lower Level 20
Baltimore, MD 21229

Phone: (410) 983-3872
Website: www.marylandctc.com

Business Hours
Mon-Fri 5:30a-11:30a
Saturday 5:30a-9:30a

pine-2Our goal at Pine Heights Treatment Center is first to stabilize patients so they can maintain independent, productive lives, and second to engage clients in the ongoing process of rehabilitation. We specialize in detoxification and recovery through medication-assisted therapy, counseling, and support services. This unique combination of services allows patients to rid their system of toxic substances in the most comfortable and convenient manner available, and to return to normal life drug-free. As patients progress with treatment, they may begin making less frequent visits to the center and administering their own medications at home – all with the support of their therapist and the clinic staff. Treatment continues until the individual has mastered the basic skills for self-care and ongoing recovery.

Pine Heights Treatment Center – 3455 Wilkens Ave, Baltimore

 

Youth and Opioid Addiction

In past decades, opioid addiction was skewed more heavily toward an older generation of adults. But today we have larger numbers of youth using opioids and experiencing addiction-related problems at earlier ages. Importantly, research has demonstrated conclusively that those who remain engaged in treatment for six months or more are much more likely to stabilize and to enjoy sustained success with recovery.

A recent Reuters Health article highlights the fact that many opioid-addicted youth are either not yet engaging in treatment or are exiting treatment too early. While more youth are being saved through the overdose reversal drug naloxone, a majority of addicted youth are still not receiving medicated-assisted treatments such as buprenorphine or methadone.

More work is necessary to open up treatment avenues for young adults across America, and to both educate & compel youth to seek MAT (medication-assisted treatment) as soon as possible.

The opioid addiction problem in America will not soon disappear. Drugs continue to find their way across the U.S. border through multiple avenues. Positive efforts are indeed bringing needed change, but the complexity and extent of opioid addiction in the U.S. will require a long-term, sustained commitment throughout the country. We must get the message out – especially to young people who may not fully grasp the power of addiction!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Heroin, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Addiction, Opioid Addiction, Recovery, Rehab For Teens, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Youth and Opioid Addiction

Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

Opioid Use Disorder is the newer clinical terminology (from the DSM5) used to describe the full range of opioid problems ranging from mild opioid-related use issues to severe opioid addiction.

The CDC reports that in 2017 there were 72,287 deaths from overdose in the United States. That is certainly an alarming statistic. Of that number, 49,060 of those deaths were from opioids specifically – just in 2017. By contrast, there were 58,200 U.S. fatalities that resulted from the entire Vietnam war.

The good news is that government funding for opioid treatment is finally entering the stream on a local level. Increasing numbers of methadone clinics and physicians authorized to prescribe buprenorphine are moving into America’s more rural areas, ones that have historically been severely underserved.

As treatment for Opioid Use Disorder becomes more readily available, people struggling under the constant pressure of addiction will have an opportunity to apply the brake, and to veer onto a new path of stability and recovery. That being said, it is estimated that presently only 1 person of 10 with an opioid use disorder has sought treatment. For many opioid addicted people, treatment made the difference between life and death.

Choose a new path is more than words for those that have truly done so. Addiction is a highly persistent disease, but change is possible. Commitment and action are the necessary ingredients in opening the door to a new life. Opioid Use Disorder, in particular, is successfully treated with medication assistance. Science, research, and life experience have fortunately reinforced this fact with perfect clarity. Please find a local treatment provider today!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

A Presidential briefing on March 19, 2018 in Manchester, NH was used to announce that ADAPT Pharma has volunteered to provide, for free, the life-saving medication NARCAN® to all U.S. high schools, colleges and universities.

NARCAN® is a name brand overdose antidote (based on naloxone) that restores breathing and consciousness in opioid overdose victims typically within five minutes.

ADAPT Pharma offers a 40% discount off wholesale pricing on the Narcan nasal spray to Law Enforcement agencies and Firefighters as well as non-profit community based organizations.

Seamus Mulligan, CEO of ADAPT, commented in a company press release that ADAPT is committed to raising awareness of opioid overdose risks and distributing NARCAN® widely so that it will be available to bystanders and emergency personnel who can offer immediate help in the event of a crisis.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Methadone, Naloxone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

What Is Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an opioid treatment medication that works very differently than either methadone or buprenorphine.

Naltrexone functions as an opioid blocker that interferes with the euphoric effects of opiates. Unlike methadone, naltrexone does not eliminate opioid withdrawal. So it is typically only begun following a successful period of opioid detoxification.

Naltrexone is taken as a pill or as a time-released injectable. It blocks the feeling of getting high thus deterring a person from continuing in active drug use with opioids. If there’s no pay off for using, why do it?

Some individuals who don’t necessarily require methadone or buprenorphine can effectively utilize naltrexone as a component of their recovery program. Vivitrol is the time-released, branded version of naltrexone that is taken once monthly as an injection. With Vivitrol, the naltrexone remains active in the bloodstream for 30 days and blocks the effects of heroin or other opiate use. This reinforces one’s focus on recovery choices and can reduce opioid cravings.

Patients receiving naltrexone may develop a lowered tolerance to opioids over time, and should remain aware of the risk of opioid overdose should they relapse. The medication is also used in the treatment of alcohol dependency and has been shown to reduce the euphoric effects of alcohol consumption.

Naltrexone is not to be confused with Naloxone. Naloxone is the opioid overdose reversal medication that has recently been in the news for saving thousands of lives across the country.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Drug Treatment, Methadone Clinics, Naltrexone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Vivitrol | Comments Off on What Is Naltrexone