Johnson City Suboxone Doctors

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Johnson City has experienced a significant problem with the proliferation of opioids in the past decade causing serious concerns among Tennessee families and healthcare providers. Consequently, Johnson City has seen the emergence of an above average number of local physicians certified to prescribe suboxone to those suffering with opioid addiction. Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) has become the standard of care in good addiction treatment programs for individuals that have developed a moderate to severe opioid dependency.

If you are a local doctor who treats Johnson City residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your opioid treatment services will be located by prospective patients searching our website for a quality suboxone provider. Suboxone (buprenorphine) has emerged as a top therapeutic tool for opioid addicted individuals. Methadone.US is striving to inform the public about the variety of opioid replacement therapy options available in or near Johnson City.





Johnson City Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Ray Mettetal, M.D. 3201 Bristol Hwy, Suite 4,
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 282-5951
Millard Ray Lamb, M.D. Recovery Associates Inc, of Tennessee
401 East Main Street
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 571-7407
Martin P. Eason, M.D. 205 High Point Drive
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 631-0731
Stephen Douglas Loyd, M.D. 205 High Point Drive
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 631-0732
Laura Vanini Grobovsky, M.D. 501 East Watauga Avenue
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 722-8446
Christine Anne Carrejo, M.D. Watauga Family Practice
501 East Watauga Avenue
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 722-8446
Cynthia Polhemus Partain, M.D. 401 East Main Street
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 929-2584
Matthew Morgan Gangwer, M.D. 401 East Main Street
Suite 3
Johnson City, TN 37601
(706) 244-1390
David Lionel Forester, M.D. 209 East Unaka Avenue
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 434-4677
Michael Sanders Wysor, M.D. Medical Care Walk In Clinic
105 Broyles Drive, Suite B
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 722-4000
Stephen R. Cirelli, M.D. Medical Care Clinic
105 Broyles Drive
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 722-4000
Edward Herschel Crutchfield, M.D. 105 Broyles Street
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 946-3199
Jose L. Lopez-Romero 100 West Unaka Avenue
Suite 4
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 928-1393
Aubrey Doyce McElroy, Jr. 3201 Bristol Highway
Suite 4
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 262-8132
Douglas P. Williams, M.D. Recovery Associates
401 E. Main Street, Unit #3
Johnson City, TN 37601
(423) 232-0222
Sonya Saadati, D.O. 926 West Oakland Avenue
Suite 222
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 282-3379
Hemang Vinodrai Naik, M.D. 100 West Unaka
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 928-1393
Jason John Della Vecchia, M.D. Catalyst Health Solutions
926 West Oakland Avenue, Suite 222
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 282-3379
Craig Michael Haire, M.D. 3114 Browns Mill Road
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 631-0432
Jaclyn Waddey Newman, M.D. 826 Polk Avenue
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 929-2854
John N. Argerson, M.D. 926 West Oakland Avenue
Suite 222
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 282-3379
Tracy Harrison Goen, M.D. 3114 Browns Mill Road
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 631-0432
Edgar Alan Ongtengco, M.D. 2514 Wesley Street
Suite 101
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 833-5547
Robert David Reeves, M.D. 926 West Oakland Avenue
Suite 222
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 282-3379
Rakesh Patel, M.D. 403 North State of Franklin Road
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 979-0565
Jack R. Woodside, Jr., M.D. 917 West Walnut Street
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 439-6464
Timothy S. Smyth, M.D. 926 West Oakland Avenue
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 282-3379
Hetal K. Brahmbhatt, M.D. 500 Longview Drive
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 975-5444
John McClellan Miller, M.D. 811 Wedgewood Road
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 282-5381
Constantino Diaz-Miranda, M.D. 3114 Browns Mill Road
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 631-0432
Charles Lee Backus III Morgan Counseling Services
412 West Unaka Street
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 833-5547
Michael Dandridge Tino, M.D. Doctors Assisted Wellness
100 West Unaka Avenue,Suite #3,4,5
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 928-1393
Ralph Thomas Reach 3114 Browns Mill Road
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 631-0432
Navneet Gupta, M.D. 101 Med Tech Parkway
Suite 200
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 232-6120
LeRoy Robert Osborne, D.O. Morgan Counseling & Accociates
214 West Unaka Avenue
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 676-9015
Marianne Elizabeth Filka, M.D. Watauga Recovery Center
3114 Browns Mill Road
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 631-0432
James Wesley Denham, M.D. 1747 Skyline Drive
Unit 25
Johnson City, TN 37604
(901) 210-5079
William Edward Kyle, D.O. 3114 Brownsmill Road
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 631-0272
Donald Ray Sleeter, M.D. 3114 Browns Mill Road
Johnson City, TN 37604
(423) 631-0432
Kelly D. Chumbley, D.O. Emmaus Medical and Counseling
273 Highway 11 E, Suite A
Bulls Gap, TN 37111
(423) 676-8400
Zia Ur Rahman, M.D. 1098 Charter Row
Johnson city, TN 37604
(423) 440-5135



1-800 Counselor Phone Support

800-counselorPalm Partners is a drug rehabilitation and recovery program located in Delray Beach, Florida. The organization provides a 24 hour hotline for individuals interested in learning about addiction treatment options.

Their website also provides an online chat alternative for speaking with an addiction counselor. Individuals facing addiction often alternate between being sick & tired of what they are going through and just giving in to the addiction as a result of being tired of the fight. Apprehension and feelings of fear have kept many addicted people from actively seeking help.

Speaking with supportive professionals (as well as others in recovery) can provide hope that people really can recover, and regain their quality of life.

From year to year, there has been a continual rise in the United States in the prevalence of addictive disorders. Over the past 5 years in particular, opioid addiction has moved into the forefront of both media coverage and general public awareness.

Some professionals contend that addiction treatment resources have shrunk over the last 15 years as a result of cuts in state funding and third party insurance coverage. What the next few years holds remains a question at this point in time. While there is interest in expanding addiction treatment services across the country, government funding is limited due to the growing national deficit and inability of government leaders to revitalize the economy through appropriate business incentives.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Drug Rehab Programs, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Addiction, Recovery, Suboxone | Tagged | Comments Off

Cassava Recovery App For Mobile Phones

cassava-appA new mobile phone app for recovering people was released last month by Elements Behavioral Health based out of Long Beach, California. The app is called Cassava and it provides a number of nifty features such as a daily reflection, a support group meetings finder based on your location, and a personal sobriety tracker that measures one’s number of days drug free.

In addition to days sober, the app allows users to record in a personal journal format their moods, daily nutrition, and even sleep patterns. An important part of growth in recovery is following new disciplines and remaining aware of self-care needs. The Cassava app can function as a useful toot for recovering people aiming to feed their recovery on a daily basis.

Another potentially helpful feature of the app is the inclusion of “recovery tips”. These function as reminders and suggestions for ways to cope with relapse risks. Addicted people, particularly in the early phase of recovery, are more vulnerable to sudden urges to use and often need a means of redirecting their thinking in order to sidestep a build-up of thoughts that feed the urge to use. Reading recovery literature has always been a potentially useful action step that helps to short circuit urges and cravings.

The app is free and can be downloaded from the Apple website. While it is designed for Apple iPhone 5.0 and above, I was able to install the app on version 4.0 and it worked well.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, California Drug Treatment, Drug Rehab Programs, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Treatment, Recovery, Recovery Support, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off

Stepping Onto The Path of Recovery

the-pathAn important consideration in examining the disease of addiction is the recognition that “recovery” is an incremental process. Many people facing their addiction will experience brief setbacks, and some will struggle for years before they are able to remain on the path of positive change.

As a counselor, I have listened to many recovering individuals talk about their resistance to change. Addiction is a persistent disease of disruptive thinking and behavior highly subject to repetition. Addicts will repeat the same bad “choices” as a result of many factors. Scientific research has shown that habitual patterns of behavior are neurochemically driven deep within the brain. These patterns can be reinforced by one’s social connections, immediate environment, and underlying belief system.

With severe levels of addiction sustained over years, it can become difficult for people to shift their lifestyle, thinking, and decision-making toward a healthy, recovery-oriented mindset. In 12 Step recovery, there is the popular expression called “hitting bottom”. This expression is typically used to describe a specific time in which a person has lost so much, or suffered such a painful crisis, that their readiness for change finally emerges. This window of opportunity is often times short-lived. Hitting bottom will compel some people to finally take the right action – to seek help – to admit they have a problem. If this happens, then a decision to step onto the path of recovery may actually occur.

Active addition is often characterized by a short range view in which consequences are not thoroughly considered. Focusing on consequences interferes with the compulsive desire to use. And even then, a recognition of consequences to oneself and family is often not enough to change the decision to get high. With opiate addiction, the decision to use is overwhelmingly controlled by opiate withdrawal sickness. This never-ending physical sickness takes people away from recovery and keeps them trapped in a desperate existence centered around doing whatever is necessary to avoid being “dope sick”.

Fortunately, this dilemma can be addressed through medication-assisted treatments (methadone, suboxone, naltrexone). These do not replace the need for a recovery program, but they become an important part of one’s overall personal recovery program. Staying on the path of recovery is the next critical phase after stepping onto the path. Medication-assisted treatment greatly aids recovering addicts in staying on the proper path. Science has proven that those with the greatest chance of long-term, successful sobriety are those that remain in treatment and recovery. Said differently, a person’s chance of recovery success is statistically improved the longer they remain in treatment.

When a person no longer has to face the crippling weight of daily withdrawal sickness, they have a chance to re-approach their overall recovery and the opportunities that lie ahead of them.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Naltrexone, Recovery, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics | Tagged , | Comments Off

Reducing Risk of IV-Related Infections

drug-safetyOne of the risks associated with the progression of opioid addiction is the increased probability of an addicted person moving to injectable heroin as a last resort in dealing with opioid withdrawal. In the early years of methadone’s adoption in treatment centers, it was used primarily to help heroin addicted individuals detox from heroin and eventually remain heroin free.

While heroin is definitely resurfacing, the opioid epidemic of recent years has primarily been about prescription opioids taken orally. Following this pattern of use, users eventually discover that crushing and snorting pills is a more efficient means of getting an opioid into their system. Injecting is typically the last step in this progression of the disease of addiction.

But with injection comes a variety of new risks and health problems such as skin abscesses, localized infection at the site of injection, as well as hepatitis C (a viral infection of the liver) and HIV infection acquired through needle sharing with infected persons. A recent story in the news highlighted a sudden increase in HIV infections in Scott County (Indiana) in conjunction with the rise of opioid addiction there and injectable drug use.

Indiana’s governor has temporarily approved the use of needle exchange programs to help reduce the risk of virus transmission resulting from the use of dirty needles. The story indicated that the number of documented HIV infections had risen month over month. The county is presently trying to locate over 100 people who may have been exposed to the HIV virus in connection with injecting opiates.

Methadone and other medication-assisted treatments have been conclusively proven to reduce heroin/opiate relapse and injection drug use. For many individuals trapped in a daily cycle of perpetual drug abuse, the risk of acquiring a deadly infection increases with every day that they are not in treatment receiving help.

Treatment leads to recovery, and recovery leads to dramatic lifestyle change. Many patients who choose methadone as a tool in their personal recovery never go back to injecting drugs. This obviously is a life saving choice.

Someone recently stated “If you’re dead, you can’t recovery.” This is a rather blunt way of expressing a profound and meaningful truth. Addiction does rob loved ones, friends, family, and neighbors of life, health, and happiness. Recovery has the ability to restore all of these. Let us keep our minds and hearts open about the value of medication-assisted treatment. It is making a real difference for numerous people around the world.

Posted in Drug Safety, Harm Reduction, Heroin, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off