Pittsburgh Suboxone Doctors

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Pittsburgh has various treatment alternatives for people struggling with a chronic opioid addiction. Prescription opioids have become a substantial nationwide problem with more people now dependent on them than heroin. With the unprecedented rise in opioid addiction over the past decade, methadone and suboxone have become increasingly needed as treatment interventions to assist those coping with opiate withdrawal symptoms. Pittsburgh maintains a significant number of approved physicians able to write suboxone prescriptions. Suboxone is now more popular and is widely available across the U.S. based on its positive track record in alleviating opioid withdrawal. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Pittsburgh residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.





Pittsburgh Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Allan William Clark, M.D. 850 Boyce Road
Suite 2
Pittsburgh, PA 15017
(724) 260-5179
Anthony J. Cancilla, M.D. 600 Washington Avenue
Suite 100
Pittsburgh, PA 15017
(412) 257-5900
April S. Clark, M.D. Summit Medical Services Pittsburgh
3121 Smallman Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15201
(412) 281-1521
Ronald Rager, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 734-1100
Parviz Jian, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Suite LL
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 766-6888
Joseph Fine, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 734-1100
David Louis Blinn, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 761-5535
Dilwara Begum, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 734-1100
Frank R. Santamaria, M.D. 1517 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 232-3555
Paul D. Bianculli, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Ll1
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 734-1100
Nadeem Ahmed, M.D. 330 South 9th Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15203
(412) 488-4040
Daniel David Janiak, D.O. Crafton Medical Center
1 Walsh Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15205
(412) 921-1104
Michael Xuehui Su, M.D. Oxford Building 3501 Forbes Ave, Rm 926
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(412) 246-5948
Frances M. Southwick, D.O. 117 North Negley Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(412) 404-4000
John A. Gurklis, Jr, M.D. VA Pittsburgh Health Care System
7180 Highland Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(412) 365-5160
Daniel Paul Lapp, M.D. 117 North Negley Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(412) 404-4000
Frank Alfred Kunkel, M.D. 748 North Negley Avenue
Suite X
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(724) 591-5236
Ben Peter Jagiello, M.D. 748 North Negley Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(724) 591-5236
Robert A. Lowenstein, M.D. 211 North Whitfield Street
Suite 475
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(412) 661-5437
Arnold J. Snitzer, M.D. 748 North Negley Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(724) 591-5236
Abimbola Yabo Talabi, M.D. 748 North Negley Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(724) 591-5236
Felicia Young, M.D. 7227 Hamilton Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
(412) 244-4700
Carol Zisowitz, M.D. Wpic
6714 Kelly St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
(412) 363-7383
George McCollum, M.D. 514 Beltzhoover Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15210
(412) 431-3080
Norman J. Frey III, D.O. 20 Bailey Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15211
(412) 381-4200
Nosratollah Danaie, M.D. 20 Bailey Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15211
(412) 381-1600
Gulam Ali Akther Noorani, M.D. Allegheny General Hospital
320 East North Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15212
(201) 394-7271
Harvey D. Shipkovitz, M.D. 1312 Federal Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15212
(412) 321-0255
Muhammad Hamza Habib, M.D. UPMC Montefiore 933 West
200 Lothrop Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 692-4839
Julie A. Kmiec, D.O. 3811 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 363-7383
Antoine B. Douaihy, M.D. 3811 O'Hara Street
Suite 1059
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 586-9537
Gerald D. Klug, M.D. 3528 Boulevard of the Allies
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 681-1406
Venkat Laxman Reddy, M.D. Priority Health Care
3528 Boulevard of the Allies
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 681-1406
Phyllis Montellese, M.D. 128 North Craig Street
Suite 216
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 681-3200
Jordan Friedman Karp, M.D. WPIC; Bellefield Tower location
100 N Bellefield Ave. Lower Level Pharm.
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 246-6048
Garrett Matthew Sparks, M.D. 3811 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 586-9331
Jessica Cipoletti Derreberry, M.D. Oxford Building
3501 Forbes Avenue, Room 926
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 246-5948
Duane Gerald Spiker, M.D. WPIC – BT 806
3811 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 246-5400
Phu Gia Phan, M.D. WPIC, UPMC
3811 O'Hair Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 246-5710
Curtis Vincent Mayernik, M.D. Western Psychiatric Institute of UPMC
3811 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 246-5819
Angelo Constantino, M.D. 200 Delafield Road, Suite 4005
200 Medical Arts Building
Pittsburgh, PA 15215
(412) 784-2323
Fereydoon Daniel Radfar, M.D. 2987 West Liberty Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15216
(412) 344-4010
Manuel D. Reich, D.O. 6640 Forest Glen Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(724) 260-5179
Ben Peter Jagiello, M.D. 1900 Murray Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(724) 591-5236
Frank Alfred Kunkel, M.D. 1900 Murray Avenue
Suite 301
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(724) 591-5236
Robert A. Woolhandler, M.D. 5562 Wilkins Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(412) 422-0500
Leonard Merkow, M.D. 3301 Beechwood Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(412) 521-0477
Paul S. Caplan, M.D. 1900 Murray Avenue
Suite 301
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(888) 309-4738



Stepping Onto The Path of Recovery

the-pathAn important consideration in examining the disease of addiction is the recognition that “recovery” is an incremental process. Many people facing their addiction will experience brief setbacks, and some will struggle for years before they are able to remain on the path of positive change.

As a counselor, I have listened to many recovering individuals talk about their resistance to change. Addiction is a persistent disease of disruptive thinking and behavior highly subject to repetition. Addicts will repeat the same bad “choices” as a result of many factors. Scientific research has shown that habitual patterns of behavior are neurochemically driven deep within the brain. These patterns can be reinforced by one’s social connections, immediate environment, and underlying belief system.

With severe levels of addiction sustained over years, it can become difficult for people to shift their lifestyle, thinking, and decision-making toward a healthy, recovery-oriented mindset. In 12 Step recovery, there is the popular expression called “hitting bottom”. This expression is typically used to describe a specific time in which a person has lost so much, or suffered such a painful crisis, that their readiness for change finally emerges. This window of opportunity is often times short-lived. Hitting bottom will compel some people to finally take the right action – to seek help – to admit they have a problem. If this happens, then a decision to step onto the path of recovery may actually occur.

Active addition is often characterized by a short range view in which consequences are not thoroughly considered. Focusing on consequences interferes with the compulsive desire to use. And even then, a recognition of consequences to oneself and family is often not enough to change the decision to get high. With opiate addiction, the decision to use is overwhelmingly controlled by opiate withdrawal sickness. This never-ending physical sickness takes people away from recovery and keeps them trapped in a desperate existence centered around doing whatever is necessary to avoid being “dope sick”.

Fortunately, this dilemma can be addressed through medication-assisted treatments (methadone, suboxone, naltrexone). These do not replace the need for a recovery program, but they become an important part of one’s overall personal recovery program. Staying on the path of recovery is the next critical phase after stepping onto the path. Medication-assisted treatment greatly aids recovering addicts in staying on the proper path. Science has proven that those with the greatest chance of long-term, successful sobriety are those that remain in treatment and recovery. Said differently, a person’s chance of recovery success is statistically improved the longer they remain in treatment.

When a person no longer has to face the crippling weight of daily withdrawal sickness, they have a chance to re-approach their overall recovery and the opportunities that lie ahead of them.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Naltrexone, Recovery, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics | Tagged , | Comments Off

Reducing Risk of IV-Related Infections

drug-safetyOne of the risks associated with the progression of opioid addiction is the increased probability of an addicted person moving to injectable heroin as a last resort in dealing with opioid withdrawal. In the early years of methadone’s adoption in treatment centers, it was used primarily to help heroin addicted individuals detox from heroin and eventually remain heroin free.

While heroin is definitely resurfacing, the opioid epidemic of recent years has primarily been about prescription opioids taken orally. Following this pattern of use, users eventually discover that crushing and snorting pills is a more efficient means of getting an opioid into their system. Injecting is typically the last step in this progression of the disease of addiction.

But with injection comes a variety of new risks and health problems such as skin abscesses, localized infection at the site of injection, as well as hepatitis C (a viral infection of the liver) and HIV infection acquired through needle sharing with infected persons. A recent story in the news highlighted a sudden increase in HIV infections in Scott County (Indiana) in conjunction with the rise of opioid addiction there and injectable drug use.

Indiana’s governor has temporarily approved the use of needle exchange programs to help reduce the risk of virus transmission resulting from the use of dirty needles. The story indicated that the number of documented HIV infections had risen month over month. The county is presently trying to locate over 100 people who may have been exposed to the HIV virus in connection with injecting opiates.

Methadone and other medication-assisted treatments have been conclusively proven to reduce heroin/opiate relapse and injection drug use. For many individuals trapped in a daily cycle of perpetual drug abuse, the risk of acquiring a deadly infection increases with every day that they are not in treatment receiving help.

Treatment leads to recovery, and recovery leads to dramatic lifestyle change. Many patients who choose methadone as a tool in their personal recovery never go back to injecting drugs. This obviously is a life saving choice.

Someone recently stated “If you’re dead, you can’t recovery.” This is a rather blunt way of expressing a profound and meaningful truth. Addiction does rob loved ones, friends, family, and neighbors of life, health, and happiness. Recovery has the ability to restore all of these. Let us keep our minds and hearts open about the value of medication-assisted treatment. It is making a real difference for numerous people around the world.

Posted in Drug Safety, Harm Reduction, Heroin, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

Acadia HealthCare Opioid Addiction Treatment

acadia-healthcareAcadia Healthcare is a leading behavioral healthcare services provider headquartered out of Franklin, Tennessee. The company was established in 2005 and has experienced rapid growth as a result of strategic acquisitions and a sharp focus on the delivery of psychiatric and chemical dependency treatment services.

Acadia recently bought out CRC Health Group for a reported $1.2 billion in a well-publicized sale which closed in February 2015. The acquisition significantly expanded Acadia’s opioid addiction treatment capabilities adding approximately 82 methadone/suboxone facilities nationwide. The company is nicely positioned to serve tens of thousands of patients on a daily basis who are struggling with opioid addiction and other associated illnesses. Methadone and buprenorphine products are utilized in association with a variety of counseling approaches.

Just added to Methadone.US are five of Acadia’s opioid treatment clinics located in San Diego, Riverside, Baltimore, Portland, and Southern Indiana.

Acadia’s mission statement:

Acadia Healthcare’s mission is to create behavioral health centers where people receive care that enables them to regain hope in a supportive, caring environment.

The company presently has behavioral healthcare facilities in 37 U.S. states, the United Kingdom, and Puerto Rico. These include residential treatment centers, inpatient psychiatric hospitals, outpatient clinics, and therapeutic school-based programs.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Drug Rehab Programs, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Programs, Methadone Success, Methadone Treatment, Opiate Addiction, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics, Suboxone Doctors | Tagged , | Comments Off

Right Path Clinics Offer Suboxone and Addiction Counseling

right-path-clinics-2Right Path is an opioid treatment provider operating in the greater Hampton Roads area of eastern Virginia. The organization specializes in the use of burprenorphine (the critical ingredient in Suboxone that alleviates opioid withdrawal symptoms).

Right Path currently have outpatient services in Virginia Beach, Newport News, and Suffolk, but plan to soon offer a location convenient for residents and visitors along the Outer Banks.

Recognizing the importance of individualized treatment plans, Right Path tailor their services to the needs of the individual patient. While suboxone is beneficial in eliminating the pain of opioid withdrawal, addiction counseling is essential in helping patients to understand the addiction and recovery process. Right Path provide addiction counseling as a component of their overall treatment program.

Evening and weekend hours are offered, and most insurance is accepted. The Right Path website has a helpful page that outlines various questions and issues that you might cover with your Suboxone Doctor in your first appointment. Their website provides another highly informative page on Suboxone which answers many common questions about this increasingly popular medication. More information on Right Path’s locations and contact information can be obtained here:

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Buprenorphine, Drug Treatment, Methadone, Opiate Addiction, Opiate Treatment, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , , | Comments Off