Pittsburgh Suboxone Doctors

Pittsburgh Suboxone Doctor

Pittsburgh Suboxone Doctor
316 Station Street, Suite 100
Bridgeville, PA 15017

Phone: (412) 426-3550
Website: PittsburghSuboxoneDoctor.com

Pittsburgh Suboxone Doctor offers comprehensive Suboxone treatment services that help both your mind and your body recover from the grip of addiction. We combine superior medical care with compassionate counseling services in a personalized Suboxone treatment program that works for you. We believe our counseling services are a key aspect of our program, with individual counseling that addresses the root cause of your addiction and group counseling that gives you the support of others in your shoes.

Our flexible appointment times during the day and in the evening allow us to meet your lifestyle needs and respect your confidentiality. We also welcome kids into our office to make your addiction treatment as easy and as welcoming as possible.

Let us help you find your path to sobriety for a better quality of life for both you and your loved ones. Don’t wait one more day for the treatment you need. Call us now!

Call Today (412) 426-3550

Pittsburgh Suboxone Doctor – 316 Station Street, Suite 100

 

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methadone8c

Pittsburgh has various treatment alternatives for people struggling with a chronic opioid addiction. Prescription opioids have become a substantial nationwide problem with more people now dependent on them than heroin. With the unprecedented rise in opioid addiction over the past decade, methadone and suboxone have become increasingly needed as treatment interventions to assist those coping with opiate withdrawal symptoms. Pittsburgh maintains a significant number of approved physicians able to write suboxone prescriptions. Suboxone is now more popular and is widely available across the U.S. based on its positive track record in alleviating opioid withdrawal. If you are a local physician aiming to treat Pittsburgh residents, you may purchase a featured listing at the top of this page insuring that your medical services will be found by prospective patients searching our website for quality opioid treatment.



Pittsburgh Buprenorphine Suboxone Doctors
Pittsburgh Suboxone Doctor 316 Station St., Suite 100
Bridgeville, PA 15017
(412) 426-3550
Allan William Clark, M.D. 850 Boyce Road
Suite 2
Pittsburgh, PA 15017
(724) 260-5179
Anthony J. Cancilla, M.D. 600 Washington Avenue
Suite 100
Pittsburgh, PA 15017
(412) 257-5900
April S. Clark, M.D. Summit Medical Services Pittsburgh
3121 Smallman Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15201
(412) 281-1521
Ronald Rager, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 734-1100
Parviz Jian, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Suite LL
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 766-6888
Joseph Fine, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 734-1100
David Louis Blinn, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 761-5535
Dilwara Begum, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 734-1100
Frank R. Santamaria, M.D. 1517 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 232-3555
Paul D. Bianculli, M.D. 575 Lincoln Avenue
Ll1
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
(412) 734-1100
Nadeem Ahmed, M.D. 330 South 9th Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15203
(412) 488-4040
Daniel David Janiak, D.O. Crafton Medical Center
1 Walsh Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15205
(412) 921-1104
Michael Xuehui Su, M.D. Oxford Building 3501 Forbes Ave, Rm 926
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(412) 246-5948
Frances M. Southwick, D.O. 117 North Negley Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(412) 404-4000
John A. Gurklis, Jr, M.D. VA Pittsburgh Health Care System
7180 Highland Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(412) 365-5160
Daniel Paul Lapp, M.D. 117 North Negley Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(412) 404-4000
Frank Alfred Kunkel, M.D. 748 North Negley Avenue
Suite X
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(724) 591-5236
Ben Peter Jagiello, M.D. 748 North Negley Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(724) 591-5236
Robert A. Lowenstein, M.D. 211 North Whitfield Street
Suite 475
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(412) 661-5437
Arnold J. Snitzer, M.D. 748 North Negley Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(724) 591-5236
Abimbola Yabo Talabi, M.D. 748 North Negley Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
(724) 591-5236
Felicia Young, M.D. 7227 Hamilton Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
(412) 244-4700
Carol Zisowitz, M.D. Wpic
6714 Kelly St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15208
(412) 363-7383
George McCollum, M.D. 514 Beltzhoover Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15210
(412) 431-3080
Norman J. Frey III, D.O. 20 Bailey Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15211
(412) 381-4200
Nosratollah Danaie, M.D. 20 Bailey Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15211
(412) 381-1600
Gulam Ali Akther Noorani, M.D. Allegheny General Hospital
320 East North Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15212
(201) 394-7271
Harvey D. Shipkovitz, M.D. 1312 Federal Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15212
(412) 321-0255
Muhammad Hamza Habib, M.D. UPMC Montefiore 933 West
200 Lothrop Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 692-4839
Julie A. Kmiec, D.O. 3811 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 363-7383
Antoine B. Douaihy, M.D. 3811 O'Hara Street
Suite 1059
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 586-9537
Gerald D. Klug, M.D. 3528 Boulevard of the Allies
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 681-1406
Venkat Laxman Reddy, M.D. Priority Health Care
3528 Boulevard of the Allies
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 681-1406
Phyllis Montellese, M.D. 128 North Craig Street
Suite 216
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 681-3200
Jordan Friedman Karp, M.D. WPIC; Bellefield Tower location
100 N Bellefield Ave. Lower Level Pharm.
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 246-6048
Garrett Matthew Sparks, M.D. 3811 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 586-9331
Jessica Cipoletti Derreberry, M.D. Oxford Building
3501 Forbes Avenue, Room 926
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 246-5948
Duane Gerald Spiker, M.D. WPIC – BT 806
3811 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 246-5400
Phu Gia Phan, M.D. WPIC, UPMC
3811 O'Hair Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 246-5710
Curtis Vincent Mayernik, M.D. Western Psychiatric Institute of UPMC
3811 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 246-5819
Angelo Constantino, M.D. 200 Delafield Road, Suite 4005
200 Medical Arts Building
Pittsburgh, PA 15215
(412) 784-2323
Fereydoon Daniel Radfar, M.D. 2987 West Liberty Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15216
(412) 344-4010
Manuel D. Reich, D.O. 6640 Forest Glen Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(724) 260-5179
Ben Peter Jagiello, M.D. 1900 Murray Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(724) 591-5236
Frank Alfred Kunkel, M.D. 1900 Murray Avenue
Suite 301
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(724) 591-5236
Robert A. Woolhandler, M.D. 5562 Wilkins Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(412) 422-0500
Leonard Merkow, M.D. 3301 Beechwood Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(412) 521-0477
Paul S. Caplan, M.D. 1900 Murray Avenue
Suite 301
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
(888) 309-4738




Youth and Opioid Addiction

In past decades, opioid addiction was skewed more heavily toward an older generation of adults. But today we have larger numbers of youth using opioids and experiencing addiction-related problems at earlier ages. Importantly, research has demonstrated conclusively that those who remain engaged in treatment for six months or more are much more likely to stabilize and to enjoy sustained success with recovery.

A recent Reuters Health article highlights the fact that many opioid-addicted youth are either not yet engaging in treatment or are exiting treatment too early. While more youth are being saved through the overdose reversal drug naloxone, a majority of addicted youth are still not receiving medicated-assisted treatments such as buprenorphine or methadone.

More work is necessary to open up treatment avenues for young adults across America, and to both educate & compel youth to seek MAT (medication-assisted treatment) as soon as possible.

The opioid addiction problem in America will not soon disappear. Drugs continue to find their way across the U.S. border through multiple avenues. Positive efforts are indeed bringing needed change, but the complexity and extent of opioid addiction in the U.S. will require a long-term, sustained commitment throughout the country. We must get the message out – especially to young people who may not fully grasp the power of addiction!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Heroin, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Addiction, Opioid Addiction, Recovery, Rehab For Teens, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Youth and Opioid Addiction

Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

Opioid Use Disorder is the newer clinical terminology (from the DSM5) used to describe the full range of opioid problems ranging from mild opioid-related use issues to severe opioid addiction.

The CDC reports that in 2017 there were 72,287 deaths from overdose in the United States. That is certainly an alarming statistic. Of that number, 49,060 of those deaths were from opioids specifically – just in 2017. By contrast, there were 58,200 U.S. fatalities that resulted from the entire Vietnam war.

The good news is that government funding for opioid treatment is finally entering the stream on a local level. Increasing numbers of methadone clinics and physicians authorized to prescribe buprenorphine are moving into America’s more rural areas, ones that have historically been severely underserved.

As treatment for Opioid Use Disorder becomes more readily available, people struggling under the constant pressure of addiction will have an opportunity to apply the brake, and to veer onto a new path of stability and recovery. That being said, it is estimated that presently only 1 person of 10 with an opioid use disorder has sought treatment. For many opioid addicted people, treatment made the difference between life and death.

Choose a new path is more than words for those that have truly done so. Addiction is a highly persistent disease, but change is possible. Commitment and action are the necessary ingredients in opening the door to a new life. Opioid Use Disorder, in particular, is successfully treated with medication assistance. Science, research, and life experience have fortunately reinforced this fact with perfect clarity. Please find a local treatment provider today!

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Opioid Use Disorder A Modern Reality

ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

A Presidential briefing on March 19, 2018 in Manchester, NH was used to announce that ADAPT Pharma has volunteered to provide, for free, the life-saving medication NARCAN® to all U.S. high schools, colleges and universities.

NARCAN® is a name brand overdose antidote (based on naloxone) that restores breathing and consciousness in opioid overdose victims typically within five minutes.

ADAPT Pharma offers a 40% discount off wholesale pricing on the Narcan nasal spray to Law Enforcement agencies and Firefighters as well as non-profit community based organizations.

Seamus Mulligan, CEO of ADAPT, commented in a company press release that ADAPT is committed to raising awareness of opioid overdose risks and distributing NARCAN® widely so that it will be available to bystanders and emergency personnel who can offer immediate help in the event of a crisis.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Methadone, Naloxone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on ADAPT Pharma Provides Free Narcan to Colleges

What Is Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an opioid treatment medication that works very differently than either methadone or buprenorphine.

Naltrexone functions as an opioid blocker that interferes with the euphoric effects of opiates. Unlike methadone, naltrexone does not eliminate opioid withdrawal. So it is typically only begun following a successful period of opioid detoxification.

Naltrexone is taken as a pill or as a time-released injectable. It blocks the feeling of getting high thus deterring a person from continuing in active drug use with opioids. If there’s no pay off for using, why do it?

Some individuals who don’t necessarily require methadone or buprenorphine can effectively utilize naltrexone as a component of their recovery program. Vivitrol is the time-released, branded version of naltrexone that is taken once monthly as an injection. With Vivitrol, the naltrexone remains active in the bloodstream for 30 days and blocks the effects of heroin or other opiate use. This reinforces one’s focus on recovery choices and can reduce opioid cravings.

Patients receiving naltrexone may develop a lowered tolerance to opioids over time, and should remain aware of the risk of opioid overdose should they relapse. The medication is also used in the treatment of alcohol dependency and has been shown to reduce the euphoric effects of alcohol consumption.

Naltrexone is not to be confused with Naloxone. Naloxone is the opioid overdose reversal medication that has recently been in the news for saving thousands of lives across the country.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Drug Treatment, Methadone Clinics, Naltrexone, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Vivitrol | Comments Off on What Is Naltrexone