Cincinnati Methadone Treatment


University of Cincinnati Physicians Company

Addiction Sciences Division
3131 Harvey Ave., Suite 104
Cincinnati, OH 45229

Phone: (513) 585-UCAS (8227)
Website:
http://uchealth.com/services/psychiatry/addiction-sciences/

Methadone Treatment Program and Medication-enhanced outpatient treatment for opioids. Staffed by a team of addiction researchers, clinicians, and educators, we know about best practices because we helped define them!

University-Physicians3

Google Map for the University of Cincinnati Physicians Company

 


Subscribe Here To Have Your Clinic Featured in this space

Following payment completion, please email us the clinic information that will be displayed here.

methadone8c




Cincinnati offers a number of opioid treatment options with several local methadone clinics and numerous local physicians who write prescriptions for suboxone (buprenorphine). Suboxone and methadone are the two leading medications available for eliminating opioid withdrawal symptoms. Opioid replacement therapy is an industry standard best practice medical intervention for those struggling with a moderate to severe level of opioid dependency. Provided below are links to more information on opioid dependency, methadone medication, addiction counseling, and local job openings in methadone clinics.





Cincinnati Methadone Clinics
University of Cincinnati Physicians
Addiction Sciences Division
3131 Harvey Ave
Cincinnati, OH 45229
(513) 585-8227
Central Community Health Board
Drug Services Program
3020 Vernon Place
Cincinnati, OH 45219
(513) 559-2056
Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical
Center/Substance Dependency Program
3200 Vine Street, 8th Floor
Cincinnati, OH 45220
(513) 861-3100
Sojourner Recovery Services
Opiate Treatment
42 East Crescentville Road
Cincinnati, OH 45246
(513) 671-7117
East Indiana Treatment Center LLC 816 Rudolph Way
Lawrenceburg, IN 47025
(812) 537-1668

 

Cincinnati Buprenorphine Suboxone Treatment
Prime Health Group, LLC

Dr. Matthew Colburn
Dr. Kevin Brazill
Dr. Scott Bradley
Dr. Andrea Holinga
Dr. Bipin Shah
Dr. Richard Simmons
Dr. Kathe Mueller
Dr. Palav Mehta
Dr. Chinyere Ogbonna
Dr. Jessica Pineda
Dr. Rassull Suarez

4333 E. Galbraith Rd.
Cincinnati, OH 45236
(513) 543-6600
Gail M. Hellmann, M.D. 909 Sycamore Street
Suite 400
Cincinnati, OH 45202
(513) 352-1342
Hooshang Khalily, M.D. 6725 Fair Acres Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45213
(513) 731-0896
Jeffrey William Merling, M.D. CCAT
830 Ezzard Charles Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45214
(513) 381-6672
Kellie L. Boyd 125 William Howard Taft Road
Cincinnati, OH 45219
(513) 861-9433
Thomas Anh Nguyen, M.D. 260 Stetson Street
Suite # 3200
Cincinnati, OH 45219
(513) 259-0027
Roberto R. Soria The Crossroads Center
311 Martin Luther King Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45219
(513) 475-5300
Martha Lee Walden, M.D. 2123 Auburn Avenue
Suite 303
Cincinnati, OH 45219
(513) 241-1811
Michael A. Gureasko, M.D. 2123 Auburn Avenue
Suite 415
Cincinnati, OH 45219
(513) 281-8840
Luis Pagani, M.D.

2123 Auburn Ave, Ste 310
Cincinnati, OH 45219

(513) 241-2123
Deborah L. Frankowski, M.D. VA Medical Center
3200 Vine Street
Cincinnati, OH 45220
(513) 861-3100×5506
Eugene C. Somoza, M.D., Ph.D VA Medical Center
3200 Vine Street, ML-151(Rsrch. Service)
Cincinnati, OH 45220
(513) 487-7800
Debra S. Harris, M.D. Univ of Cincinnati/Cincinnati VA Med Ct
3200 Vine Street, 116-A
Cincinnati, OH 45220
(513) 861-3100×4745
Alla V. Baskakova, M.D. Cincinnati VA Medical Center
3200 Vine Street
Cincinnati, OH 45220
(513) 475-6402
Richard Jeffrey Goldsmith, M.D. VA Medical Center
3200 Vine Street
Cincinnati, OH 45220
(513) 475-6402
Show Whei Lin, M.D. 3200 Vine Street
7 East
Cincinnati, OH 45220
(513) 861-3100
Tara B. Carr, M.D. 3200 Vine Street
116-A Psychiatry
Cincinnati, OH 45220
(513) 475-6325
David Michael Fallat, M.D. 5837 Hamilton Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45224
(877) 279-5153
Center for Chemical Addictions Trt 830 Ezzard Charles Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45214
(513) 381-6672
Cincinnati Suboxone Doctors


Prime Health Group, LLC

Cincinnati Suboxone Clinic
4333 E. Galbraith Rd.
Cincinnati, OH 45236

Phone: (513) 543-6600
Email: info@opiateaddictiondoctors.com
Website: www.opiateaddictiondoctors.com

Accepting new patients
Ask about same day visits
Call 8a – 8p: 7 days/wk

Dr. Matthew Colburn
Dr. Kevin Brazill
Dr. Scott Bradley
Dr. Andrea Holinga
Dr. Bipin Shah
Dr. Richard Simmons
Dr. Kathe Mueller
Dr. Palav Mehta
Dr. Chinyere Ogbonna
Dr. Jessica Pineda
Dr. Rassull Suarez

We offer Suboxone treatment for opiate addiction in a caring and non-judgmental office setting. Suboxone (buprenorphine) is a daily medication that helps control pain pill and heroin cravings, while keeping you out of withdrawal. Unlike methadone which initially requires daily clinic visits, Suboxone can be taken at home with a prescription from your doctor. Our goal is for you to live a healthier, happier and more fulfilling life. Get started in treatment today.
Call Today 513-543-6600

prime-health-group-llc

Google Map for the Prime Health Group, LLC

 

Committing Yourself To Recovery From Addiction

mental-healthDrug and alcohol addiction are treatable illnesses. They can be successfully managed and “arrested” such that they do not continue to harm a person’s life or compromise their health. Just as with any progressive illness, a patient should commit to a course of treatment that has been proven to eradicate their illness or reduce its impact. Heart disease, cancer, diabetes, morbid obesity, alzheimer’s – all of these have established medical treatments which can increase a person’s chance of survival and/or quality of life.

Addiction is both a physiological and behavioral illness. With opioid addiction in particular, there is a strong biological/physical basis as well as a highly significant psychological component. When both of these are adequately addressed, a patient has a new opportunity to recover.

For most individuals with a severe opioid addiction, is critically important to receive physical relief from the discomfort of opioid withdrawal symptoms. But this must also happen in conjunction with behavioral health counseling. Counseling addresses the emotional & psychological factors that contributed to the development of addiction in the first place, and counseling teaches the skills necessary to remain drug free over the long-term and to hopefully avoid future relapses.

Many people find that if they neglect one of these two key areas, then they are more vulnerable to relapse and rapid deterioration. When opioid detox is not a viable option for a particular patient, methadone and suboxone are clearly the medications of choice for addressing opioid withdrawal. Counseling provides the other half of the equation. All methadone programs across the country (as well as all suboxone-approved physicians) are required to insure that their patients are receiving some level of addiction counseling.

The essential ingredient is this mix is patient commitment. Having a genuine desire for a drug free life is as important as anything else. Becoming ready for change is a process in itself and varies from person to person. It is true that many people find their way into recovery because of a recent crisis in which things get so bad they hit a new low, or bottom. This does not have to happen though.

Sometimes hitting “bottom” brings with it dire consequences. If you have been contemplating making a change, please remember that it is not too late. There are many advantages to acting today as opposed to waiting another day. Addiction loves procrastination. Recovery begins now with your commitment to doing something about your problem!

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Success, Methadone Treatment, Opiate Treatment, Recovery, Recovery Support, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors | Tagged , | Comments Off

1-800 Counselor Phone Support

800-counselorPalm Partners is a drug rehabilitation and recovery program located in Delray Beach, Florida. The organization provides a 24 hour hotline for individuals interested in learning about addiction treatment options.

Their website also provides an online chat alternative for speaking with an addiction counselor. Individuals facing addiction often alternate between being sick & tired of what they are going through and just giving in to the addiction as a result of being tired of the fight. Apprehension and feelings of fear have kept many addicted people from actively seeking help.

Speaking with supportive professionals (as well as others in recovery) can provide hope that people really can recover, and regain their quality of life.

From year to year, there has been a continual rise in the United States in the prevalence of addictive disorders. Over the past 5 years in particular, opioid addiction has moved into the forefront of both media coverage and general public awareness.

Some professionals contend that addiction treatment resources have shrunk over the last 15 years as a result of cuts in state funding and third party insurance coverage. What the next few years holds remains a question at this point in time. While there is interest in expanding addiction treatment services across the country, government funding is limited due to the growing national deficit and inability of government leaders to revitalize the economy through appropriate business incentives.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Drug Rehab Programs, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Addiction, Recovery, Suboxone | Tagged | Comments Off

Cassava Recovery App For Mobile Phones

cassava-appA new mobile phone app for recovering people was released last month by Elements Behavioral Health based out of Long Beach, California. The app is called Cassava and it provides a number of nifty features such as a daily reflection, a support group meetings finder based on your location, and a personal sobriety tracker that measures one’s number of days drug free.

In addition to days sober, the app allows users to record in a personal journal format their moods, daily nutrition, and even sleep patterns. An important part of growth in recovery is following new disciplines and remaining aware of self-care needs. The Cassava app can function as a useful toot for recovering people aiming to feed their recovery on a daily basis.

Another potentially helpful feature of the app is the inclusion of “recovery tips”. These function as reminders and suggestions for ways to cope with relapse risks. Addicted people, particularly in the early phase of recovery, are more vulnerable to sudden urges to use and often need a means of redirecting their thinking in order to sidestep a build-up of thoughts that feed the urge to use. Reading recovery literature has always been a potentially useful action step that helps to short circuit urges and cravings.

The app is free and can be downloaded from the Apple website. While it is designed for Apple iPhone 5.0 and above, I was able to install the app on version 4.0 and it worked well.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, California Drug Treatment, Drug Rehab Programs, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Treatment, Recovery, Recovery Support, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off

Stepping Onto The Path of Recovery

the-pathAn important consideration in examining the disease of addiction is the recognition that “recovery” is an incremental process. Many people facing their addiction will experience brief setbacks, and some will struggle for years before they are able to remain on the path of positive change.

As a counselor, I have listened to many recovering individuals talk about their resistance to change. Addiction is a persistent disease of disruptive thinking and behavior highly subject to repetition. Addicts will repeat the same bad “choices” as a result of many factors. Scientific research has shown that habitual patterns of behavior are neurochemically driven deep within the brain. These patterns can be reinforced by one’s social connections, immediate environment, and underlying belief system.

With severe levels of addiction sustained over years, it can become difficult for people to shift their lifestyle, thinking, and decision-making toward a healthy, recovery-oriented mindset. In 12 Step recovery, there is the popular expression called “hitting bottom”. This expression is typically used to describe a specific time in which a person has lost so much, or suffered such a painful crisis, that their readiness for change finally emerges. This window of opportunity is often times short-lived. Hitting bottom will compel some people to finally take the right action – to seek help – to admit they have a problem. If this happens, then a decision to step onto the path of recovery may actually occur.

Active addition is often characterized by a short range view in which consequences are not thoroughly considered. Focusing on consequences interferes with the compulsive desire to use. And even then, a recognition of consequences to oneself and family is often not enough to change the decision to get high. With opiate addiction, the decision to use is overwhelmingly controlled by opiate withdrawal sickness. This never-ending physical sickness takes people away from recovery and keeps them trapped in a desperate existence centered around doing whatever is necessary to avoid being “dope sick”.

Fortunately, this dilemma can be addressed through medication-assisted treatments (methadone, suboxone, naltrexone). These do not replace the need for a recovery program, but they become an important part of one’s overall personal recovery program. Staying on the path of recovery is the next critical phase after stepping onto the path. Medication-assisted treatment greatly aids recovering addicts in staying on the proper path. Science has proven that those with the greatest chance of long-term, successful sobriety are those that remain in treatment and recovery. Said differently, a person’s chance of recovery success is statistically improved the longer they remain in treatment.

When a person no longer has to face the crippling weight of daily withdrawal sickness, they have a chance to re-approach their overall recovery and the opportunities that lie ahead of them.

Posted in Addiction Recovery, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Naltrexone, Recovery, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics | Tagged , | Comments Off

Reducing Risk of IV-Related Infections

drug-safetyOne of the risks associated with the progression of opioid addiction is the increased probability of an addicted person moving to injectable heroin as a last resort in dealing with opioid withdrawal. In the early years of methadone’s adoption in treatment centers, it was used primarily to help heroin addicted individuals detox from heroin and eventually remain heroin free.

While heroin is definitely resurfacing, the opioid epidemic of recent years has primarily been about prescription opioids taken orally. Following this pattern of use, users eventually discover that crushing and snorting pills is a more efficient means of getting an opioid into their system. Injecting is typically the last step in this progression of the disease of addiction.

But with injection comes a variety of new risks and health problems such as skin abscesses, localized infection at the site of injection, as well as hepatitis C (a viral infection of the liver) and HIV infection acquired through needle sharing with infected persons. A recent story in the news highlighted a sudden increase in HIV infections in Scott County (Indiana) in conjunction with the rise of opioid addiction there and injectable drug use.

Indiana’s governor has temporarily approved the use of needle exchange programs to help reduce the risk of virus transmission resulting from the use of dirty needles. The story indicated that the number of documented HIV infections had risen month over month. The county is presently trying to locate over 100 people who may have been exposed to the HIV virus in connection with injecting opiates.

Methadone and other medication-assisted treatments have been conclusively proven to reduce heroin/opiate relapse and injection drug use. For many individuals trapped in a daily cycle of perpetual drug abuse, the risk of acquiring a deadly infection increases with every day that they are not in treatment receiving help.

Treatment leads to recovery, and recovery leads to dramatic lifestyle change. Many patients who choose methadone as a tool in their personal recovery never go back to injecting drugs. This obviously is a life saving choice.

Someone recently stated “If you’re dead, you can’t recovery.” This is a rather blunt way of expressing a profound and meaningful truth. Addiction does rob loved ones, friends, family, and neighbors of life, health, and happiness. Recovery has the ability to restore all of these. Let us keep our minds and hearts open about the value of medication-assisted treatment. It is making a real difference for numerous people around the world.

Posted in Drug Safety, Harm Reduction, Heroin, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off