Jacksonville Methadone Treatment

North Florida Comprehensive Treatment Center

North Florida Comprehensive Treatment Center
6639 Southpoint Parkway, Suite 108
Jacksonville, FL 32216

Phone: (844) 202-6950
Website: jacksonvillectc.com

Acadia HealthcareTreatment Types
Methadone & Subutex
Maintenance

Facility Type
Outpatient serving Adults

With treatment that is specifically created for women and men aged 18 and older who are battling with opioid addiction, North Florida Comprehensive Treatment Center provides medication assisted treatment and a number of therapeutic treatment modalities that have proven to be effective in aiding individuals move towards defeating their opioid addictions once and for all. It is our goal to help all individuals who come to us for care so they can not only defeat their addictions, but also let go of their compulsion to use and begin living a life free of substance abuse.

 

 


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This city has several area methadone clinics providing methadone replacement therapy and structured counseling. Available via local physicians is suboxone (with buprenorphine) which provides relief from opiate withdrawal symptoms for a significant number of people. Below are links to more info on methadone program effectiveness, opioid dependency, addiction & recovery counseling, and job openings in methadone clinics.


Jacksonville Methadone Clinics
North Florida Comprehensive Treatment Center 6639 Southpoint Parkway,
Suite 108
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(844) 202-6950
River Region Human Services Inc
Dual Diagnosis Program
390 Park Street
Jacksonville, FL 32204
(904) 899-6300×4201
Jacksonville Metro Treatment Center 3609 Emerson Street
Jacksonville, FL 32207
(904) 398-7015
River Region Human Services Inc 2981 Parental Home Road
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 899-6300×4300
Stepping Stone Center for Recovery 1815 Corporate Square Boulevard, Building 100
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 446-1041

 

Jacksonville Buprenorphine Suboxone Treatment
Jeremy Mirabile, MD, ABAM 7545 Centurion Parkway,
Suite 106
Jacksonville, FL 32256
(904) 551-1394
Jeremy Mirabile, MD, ABAM 1301 S. Plantation Island Dr.
Suite 201B
St. Augustine, FL 32080
(904) 342-5965
William A. McLaughlin, M.D. 555 Stockton Street
Jacksonville, FL 32204
(904) 387-4661×1024
Robert Groble, M.D. 1510 Barrs Street
Jacksonville, FL 32204
(904) 384-3354
Timothy L. Sternberg, M.D. 2627 Riverside Avenue
3rd Floor
Jacksonville, FL 32204
(904) 674-2022
Rene Uriel Pulido, M.D. 2570 Atlantic Boulevard
Jacksonville, FL 32207
(904) 647-8576
Anjali A. Pathak, M.D. 5251 Emerson Street
Jacksonville, FL 32207
(904) 399-0324
Orlando G. Florete, Jr., M.D. 820 Prudential Drive
Suite 111
Jacksonville, FL 32207
(904) 306-9860
Mohamed O. Saleh, M.D. Center for Medicine and Psychiatry
1408 San Marco Blvd.
Jacksonville, FL 32207
(904) 398-0009
Jawed Hussain, M.D. 820 Prudential Drive
Suite 111
Jacksonville, FL 32207
(904) 306-9860
Eduardo A. Sanchez, M.D. 1667 Atlantic Boulevard
Jacksonville, FL 32207
(904) 399-1818
Hagop Tabakian, M.D. University of Florida College of Medicin
655 West 8th Street
Jacksonville, FL 32209
(904) 244-5431
George R. Wilson, M.D. 655 West 8th Street
Jacksonville, FL 32209
(904) 244-3196
Gary M. Reisfield, M.D. 655 West 8th Street
Jacksonville, FL 32209
(904) 244-3196
Derek Thorpe, M.D. 4028 Blanding Boulevard
Jacksonville, FL 32210
(904) 778-8799
Diana M. Cordero, M.D. 7685 103rd Street
Suite 1
Jacksonville, FL 32210
(904) 771-1116
Syed Sajid Hussain, M.D. 7685 103rd Street
Suite 1
Jacksonville, FL 32210
(904) 771-1116
Ernst B. Michel, M.D 5851 Timuquana Road
Suite 303
Jacksonville, FL 32210
(904) 674-2699
Edward Paul Schelonka, M.D. 3560 Cardinal Point Drive
Suite 102
Jacksonville, FL 32211
(904) 296-1116
Mohammad Farooque, M.D. River Point Behavioral Health
6300 Beach Boulevard
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 429-7347
Serge Vilvar, M.D. 4160 University Boulevard South
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 376-3800
Thomas R. Murray, M.D. 2030 – C Southside Boulevard
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 721-5909
Akua Owusu, M.D. 8825 Perimeter Park Boulevard
Suite 601
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 997-0195
Henry Lepely, M.D. 4131 University Boulevard
Building 7
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 737-1300
Carlos Torrellas, M.D. 4190 Belfort Road
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 296-2999
Ismail D. Salahi, M.D. 4063 Salisbury Road North
Suite 206
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 296-3611
Sanford Z. Pollak, D.O. 4131 South University Boulevard
Unit 11
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 636-7755
Harold S. Laski, M.D. Southside Medical Center
3604 Southside Boulevard
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 641-4411
Martin Zfaz, M.D. 1815 Bradley Road
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 446-4384
Roderick T. Beaman, D.O. 3101 University Boulevard, South
Suite 203
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 764-5000
Sivanta J. Paul, M.D., P.A. 4237 Salisbury Road
Suite 301
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 279-1666
Bryan Todd Oronsky, M.D. 3100 University Boulevard South
Suite 318
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 727-7733
David W. Cheshire, M.D. 3699 University Boulevard South
Suite 400
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 399-5966
Atul Shah, M.D. 1545 Huffingham Road
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 725-6463
Michael L. Solloway, M.D. 4160 University Boulevard South
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 376-3800
Alfonso Bremer, M.D. 4237 Salisbury Road North
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 504-2961
Ana Amelia Sanchez, M.D. 6817 Southpoint Parkway
Suite 1703
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 332-0848
North Florida Comprehensive Treatment Center
Phone: (844) 202-6950


Heroin and Prescription Drug Epidemic

senate-bill-drug-treatmentThe growing problem around opioid addiction continues to receive coverage in the media, and it has become a topic of discussion on the campaign trail because candidates are being approached throughout the country by concerned families and citizens.

Marcia Taylor, President of Partnership For Drug Free Kids, provided testimony in January to a Senate Judiciary Committee on the need to increase funding for drug prevention and drug treatment. Proposed for consideration is the CARA Senate Bill which stands for Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act. CARA would allocate funding for drug treatment and prevention resources with a goal of getting more addicted individuals into treatment, and better educating both parents and teens on the dangers of recreational opioid use.

CARA would also address the need to distribute naloxone across the U.S. to aid in the fight to reduce deaths from opioid overdose. Local law enforcement would be trained on the administration of naloxone. Prescription drug monitoring programs would also receive increased support under CARA.

Methadone and Suboxone have become familiar interventions for anyone knowledgeable on opioid addiction issues. Most state-funded opioid treatment programs in the United States are currently full and have waiting lists of addicted people who are eager to participate in medication-assisted treatment.

In America, there has been a notable expansion in recent years of treatment programs who utilize methadone or suboxone to help patients. While many of these programs are private self-pay, Medicaid presently pays for methadone-based treatment approaches in a number of U.S. states. The number of private pay programs currently outnumber state-funded and Medicaid-funded programs by a substantial margin.

Posted in Buprenorphine, Heroin, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians, Teen Substance Abuse | Tagged | Comments Off on Heroin and Prescription Drug Epidemic

Expanding Access to Medication-Assisted Treatment

opioid-treatment-in-mediaAn article in the Huffington Post recently addressed President Obama’s public comments on expanding access to opioid treatment, particularly medication-assisted treatment (MAT) like methadone or buprenorphine (suboxone).

Many members of the treatment industry and recovery community do not have a realistic grasp on the role that medication-assisted treatment can play in recovery from severe opioid addiction. Historically, the recovery community has not regarded those utilizing methadone or suboxone as truly in recovery. They emphasize total abstinence, even from methadone, despite the fact that methadone and buprenorphine have restored individuals to normal functioning and even saved lives in many cases.

There was a time some years ago, in the 12 step community, when individuals were chastised for taking psychotropic medication for depression or other mental health disorders. This criticism came from a fundamental lack of knowledge about the biological basis for many mental health disorders. Similarly, medication-assisted treatment interventions have been the subject of misunderstanding and unwarranted rejection by those with limited education on varied treatment approaches.

As America’s opioid problem continues to grow, we need real solutions rooted in medical science and research. At this point in time, medication-assisted treatment has been in use long enough to clearly demonstrate its usefulness in facilitating personal recovery from addiction.

In 2015, we saw numerous local and national political figures rally around families that have been impacted by heroin overdoses and the heartbreaking loss of loved ones. Opioid addiction has finally come into focus within the mainstream media, and even current Presidential candidates have begun to address this as an important issue which commands attention and a solution.

More: Question and Answers on how methadone works

 

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Buprenorphine, Heroin, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Benefits, Methadone Blog, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Programs, Methadone Treatment, Opiate Treatment, Relapse Prevention, Suboxone, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , | Comments Off on Expanding Access to Medication-Assisted Treatment

CVS Standing For Life and Safety

methadone-recovery-1It was announced late last month that CVS Drugstores intends to expand their provision of non-prescription naloxone into 12 additional U.S. States. Currently, they provide naloxone over-the-counter in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, but will begin offering the life-saving medication in California, Minnesota, Mississippi, Arkansas, Montana, New Jersey, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Utah, South Carolina, and Wisconsin.

Naloxone has gained attention in recent years due to its ability to reverse opioid overdoses. Over 44,000 people have died annually in the United States from drug overdose with a majority of those stemming from heroin or prescription pain medication. Naloxone has been successfully utilized in emergency rooms and on site in communities around the country reversing opioid overdose and saving thousands of lives.

It is critically important to recognize that people who have suffered with addiction are sometimes close to a lasting recovery. There is a popular expression used lately that is somewhat stark though true and thought-provoking. The expression goes “You can’t recover if you’re dead.” While this may sound off-putting to some, it reminds us that people stuck in years of painful addiction can, and do, change. We would much rather have naloxone readily available to save a life and to provide a son, daughter, or friend the opportunity to change direction.

An addicted individual could be much closer to choosing a life of recovery than we might imagine. This happens on a daily basis. How, and when, someone recovers from addiction is hard to predict. All we can do is to offer them an open door to a new and better life.

More Articles on Naloxone

Posted in Addiction Recovery, California Drug Treatment, Evzio, Heroin Overdose, Methadone, Methadone Overdose, Naloxone, Opiate Addiction, Prescription Drugs, Suboxone | Tagged | Comments Off on CVS Standing For Life and Safety

Heroin Said To Be Back With A Vengeance

stop-opioid-addictionChuck Rosenberg, the new chief of the Drug Enforcement Administration, has expressed serious concerns about the continuing opioid addiction problem in America and the pervasive spread of heroin addiction in particular.

A Fox News article highlighted Mr. Rosenberg’s discussion of how the USA represents only 5% of the world’s population – but consumes 95% of the world’s hydrocodone. His position is that rampant overprescribing of opioids has been occurring for years. As individuals become addicted to prescription medications and are then cut off from further prescription refills, many turn to the illegal purchase of street opiates.

“Street” opiates are sold at a premium – often more than people can afford. This leads to increased crime in order to support the expensive habit or turning to heroin since it is reported to only cost about 20% of hydrocodone on the black market.

The Fox article states that nearly 44,000 per year are dying from drug overdose and that half of those overdoses are from prescription medications. Casualty rates have almost doubled over the last few years.

Also in the news last week was an announcement from Hillary Clinton that if elected President she plans to dedicate billions to opioid treatment. There are other candidates as well, including governor Chris Christie, that have expressed a similar commitment to addressing the opioid addiction epidemic. The groundswell of concern regarding opioid addiction has gained momentum over the past 2 years and is now an audible siren capturing the attention of many governmental leaders. It has become a real health hazard that cannot be ignored any longer.

To locate various methadone clinics and suboxone-approved physicians near your location, please visit our:

Search Clinics By State page.


Posted in Heroin, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Addiction, Suboxone, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Heroin Said To Be Back With A Vengeance

Making A New Start

methadone-graphicA study by the government agency SAMHSA indicated there were approximately 254,000 patients receiving methadone for opioid addiction in 2006. In 2015, it is most likely that number is much higher given the prevalence of opioid addiction and the continued expansion of outpatient opioid treatment services in the United States. Today, there are considerably more methadone clinics and suboxone-approved physicians than there were a decade ago.

Making a new start with medication-assisted treatment is what hundreds of people across the country are deciding to do for themselves every week. Addiction is a progressive illness – one in which a person’s ability to choose is severely compromised. Medication-assisted treatment using either methadone or buprenorphine (suboxone) provides an important open door to a more responsible, quality life.

A majority of individuals suffering with opioid addiction (particularly when the illness spans years) have experienced dramatic brain changes which deepened their physiological dependency on opiates. This physical dependency is not easily removed. It is severe and persistent thus leading the person to do whatever is necessary to avoid being sick from opioid withdrawal.

Most long-term addicted individuals will tell you they rarely, if ever, get high from the illicit substances they use. They are simply trying to avoid being sick from debilitating opioid withdrawal symptoms. When a patient chooses to receive methadone or buprenorphine under the supervision of a doctor, they are making a decision to face their illness and to do something constructive about it.

As a family or friend, it is very helpful to gain an understanding of addiction and how medication-assisted treatment can be life changing for a person stuck in the cycle of opiate addiction.

Making a new start can be a bit frightening. Will methadone work for me? Will my loved ones condemn me? What about my job, or my legal situation? It becomes easy to put off making a decision when so many questions come into play.

It is important to remember that the road to recovery begins with just one step forward. That step will lead to another and another. This new start is always available. The message is one of hope and opportunity. Opiate addiction is a treatable illness. Medication-assistance can make a real difference.

Posted in Addiction Treatment, Drug Treatment, Medication Assisted Treatment, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Programs, Methadone Success, Methadone Treatment, Opiate Treatment, Recovery, Suboxone, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Making A New Start