Gainesville Methadone Treatment

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This city has several area methadone clinics providing methadone replacement therapy and structured counseling. Available via local physicians is suboxone (with buprenorphine) which provides relief from opiate withdrawal symptoms for a significant number of people. Below are links to more info on methadone program effectiveness, opioid dependency, addiction & recovery counseling, and job openings in methadone clinics.


Gainesville Methadone Clinics
Meridian Behavioral Healthcare Inc
Addictions Outpatient and Residential
4400 SW 13th Street
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 374-5600×8230
Quad County Treatment Center 913 East Silver Springs Boulevard
Ocala, FL 34470
(352) 732-6565

 

Gainesville Buprenorphine Providers
David E. Kemp, M.D. 1026 SW 2nd Avenue
Suite D
Gainesville, FL 32601
(352) 379-1049
John J. Sassano, M.D. 1131 NW 64th Terrace
Suite C
Gainesville, FL 32605
(352) 331-5557
Youssef Wassef 6801 NW 9th Boulevard
Suite 4
Gainesville, FL 32605
(352) 367-3422
Neel H. Amin, M.D. 10509 NW 13th Lane
Gainesville, FL 32606
(706) 951-4600
Gary M. Reisfield, M.D. University of Florida
8491 NW 39th Avenue
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 265-5404
Gabriel Dan Paulian, M.D. 8491 Northwest 39th Avenue
Gainesville, FL 32606
(904) 412-3002
William Morgan Greene Shands Vista
4101 NW 89th Boulevard
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 265-5497
Louis William Solomon, M.D. Shands at Vista
4101 NW 89th Blvd
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 265-5424
Daniel Philip Logan University of Flordia College of Med.
3850 NW 83rd Street, Suite 201
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 265-5549
Martha Eugenia Brown, M.D. UF Dept. of Psych, Addiction Med. Div.
8491 NW 39th Avenue
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 265-5525
Kenneth W. Thompson, M.D. 4101 NW 89th Boulevard
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 265-5440
Scott Teitelbaum, M.D. Univ of Florida, Dept of Psychiatry
4101 NW 89 Boulevard
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 265-5440
Gary L Kanter, M.D. 100 Sw 75th Street
Suite 204
Gainesville, FL 32607
(352) 332-1300
Andrew Eric Esch, M.D. 2864 SW 92nd drive
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 222-2608
Robert Blair Sammel, M.D. Gainesville VA Medical Center (11c)
1601 SW Archer Road
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 376-1611
Leonardo Rodriguez, M.D. 1601 SW Archer Road
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 376-1611×6089
Alexander Fariborzian, M.D. 4300 SW 13th Street
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 374-5600ext817
James Cozby Byrd III, M.D. VA Medical Center
1601 SW Archer Road
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 374-6014
Camilo A. Martin, M.D. 7114 SW 97th Lane
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 284-1175
Jerome Mark Sampson, M.D. VA Medical Center
1601 SW Archer Road
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 376-1611×5019
May Eliza Montrichard, M.D. 1216 North West 22nd Avenue
Gainesville, FL 32609
(352) 378-7978
William Robert Rout, M.D. Dept. of Surgery, University of Florida
Health Science Center, Box 100286
Gainesville, FL 32610
(352) 533-5399
Joseph P. Pagano, M.D. Medical Plaza Psychiatry
2000 SW Archer Road
Gainesville, FL 32610
(352) 265-7041
North Florida/South Georgia
VA Health System
1601 SW Archer Road
Unit 116-A1 SATT
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 374-6089

Buprenorphine Implant for Opioid Addiction

buprenorphine implantThe FDA has approved a new implantable drug called Probuphine. Probuphine contains the partial opioid agonist, buprenorphine, which is used to suppress the opioid withdrawal symptoms that interfere with daily life.

The implant is the size of a matchstick and is inserted under the skin in the forearm area. It steadily releases a dose of buprenorphine which has been scientifically proven an effective treatment for eliminating opiate withdrawal symptoms in a number of people physically dependent on opioids.

With heroin and opioid overdose deaths at an all time high in the United States, this new alternative offers one more beneficial path for anyone struggling with opioid relapse and chronic withdrawal. Importantly, Probuphine only treats the physical withdrawal from opioids such that the underlying psychological factors of addiction must still be treated through counseling and other support approaches.

The Wall Street Journal has an extensive article on this new medication and the historically important role of methadone and oral buprenorphine. In the article, Nora Volkow (director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse) is quoted as saying:

Scientific evidence suggests that maintenance treatment with these medications in the context of behavioral treatment and recovery support are more effective in the treatment of opioid-use disorder than short-term detoxification programs aimed at abstinence.

Over 47,000 people died in the U.S. of drug overdoses in 2014. A majority of these were attributed to heroin and prescription painkillers. With continued coverage in the media and ongoing community discussion, more answers and helpful interventions will hopefully see the light of day.

Methadone Information | Suboxone Information

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President Proposes Funding Increase for Treating Opioid Addiction

funding drug treatmentPresident Obama recently attended the National Prescription Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta, Georgia. Professionals and concerned citizens used the forum to explore ways to address America’s rising opioid addiction problem.

The President agreed that increased funding is needed to raise access to drug treatment in an effort to simply avoid incarcerating those addicted to heroin and other potentially deadly opioids.

The NBC article referenced here states that over 28,000 people died last year from opioid overdose in the United States. This number has quadrupled since 1999. Many of the overdoses occur from various opioids laced with a powerful prescription pain killer called fentanyl.

Methadone and buprenorphone (the active ingredient in suboxone) are the leading medications used in medication-assisted treatment approaches. Naloxone is another important medication which has been used to reverse opioid overdose. It has saved thousands of lives and is being widely adopted by first responders and police departments across the country due to its proven effectiveness.

President Obama expressed that the U.S. will move toward improved drug treatment access for opioid addicted individuals and that the issue of addiction will be dealt with more as a public health issue as opposed to strictly a criminal act. Included in the proposed legislation is doubling the patient limit such that doctors can treat up to 200 people with buprenorphine (suboxone). The current patient limit is 100.

The Department of Health and Human Services is reported to have committed another $94 million to community health centers to boost their provision of medication-assisted treatment in poor and isolated communities. Many rural areas of the U.S. have very limited availability of opioid addiction services.

Online Methadone Assessment

Posted in Buprenorphine, Heroin, Heroin Overdose, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone Maintenance, Opiate Addiction, Opiate Prescription, Opioid Addiction, Prescription Drugs, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics | Comments Off on President Proposes Funding Increase for Treating Opioid Addiction

PBS Special on Heroin Addiction in America

frontlinePBS’ Frontline series of specials just aired a compelling documentary by the name of Chasing Heroin. The two hour investigation profiles a number of individuals who became addicted to opioids, some of whom chose methadone or suboxone to help them successfully manage their addictive disorder.

The documentary highlights that addiction is best addressed as a medical illness instead of a punishable criminal act. There is widespread consensus today that putting large numbers of people in prison for drug use has not been an effective approach to the problem of drug addiction.

Incarcerating users is very costly and ultimately does not lead to remaining drug free once released from prison. For those suffering with a chronic opioid addiction, medication assisted treatment has become the standard of care proven to be most effective – particularly for those individuals who have tried others forms of treatment that did not work.

The Frontline documentary linked above is very informative, but please be forewarned that it does display vivid scenes of drug use that some viewers may find disturbing. So please exercise appropriate caution before viewing.

To Learn More About Detox, Methadone, or Suboxone

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New Hampshire Addiction Crisis

womens-recoveryNBC News recently reported on the heroin crisis that New Hampshire residents have witnessed. Unprecedented numbers of people from all age groups are struggling with opioid addiction. Many are now deceased with estimates putting the number at nearly 400 who died from a fatal overdose just last year.

New Hampshire is reported to have no state-funded methadone programs to assist those experiencing severe heroin and other opioid addiction. There are several private clinics, but those are currently full with waiting lists for individuals who hope to one day be admitted.

Diane St. Onge, director of the Manchester Comprehensive Treatment Center, is quoted as saying “We need more treatment options. People’s lives are at stake.” Her clinic is presently operating at capacity with 540 patients according to the NBC article. Scores of untreated addicted adults are seeking treatment. When clinics are at capacity, they are forced to place prospective patients on a waiting list.

It is estimated that a significant number of the overdoses are related to heroin and other opiates being mixed with fentanyl and other substances. This makes the potency of the drugs being used almost impossible to predict thus greatly increasing the chance of accidental overdose.

Detox or medication-assisted treatment are the primary modes of intervention for those with opioid addiction. While there has been a substantial increase nationwide in the number of clinics dedicated to treating opioid addiction, there remain numerous areas throughout the country where methadone and suboxone support services are not yet readily available.

Posted in Buprenorphine, Heroin, Heroin Overdose, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Methadone News, Methadone Treatment, Opiate Addiction, Suboxone | Tagged , , | Comments Off on New Hampshire Addiction Crisis

Heroin and Prescription Drug Epidemic

senate-bill-drug-treatmentThe growing problem around opioid addiction continues to receive coverage in the media, and it has become a topic of discussion on the campaign trail because candidates are being approached throughout the country by concerned families and citizens.

Marcia Taylor, President of Partnership For Drug Free Kids, provided testimony in January to a Senate Judiciary Committee on the need to increase funding for drug prevention and drug treatment. Proposed for consideration is the CARA Senate Bill which stands for Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act. CARA would allocate funding for drug treatment and prevention resources with a goal of getting more addicted individuals into treatment, and better educating both parents and teens on the dangers of recreational opioid use.

CARA would also address the need to distribute naloxone across the U.S. to aid in the fight to reduce deaths from opioid overdose. Local law enforcement would be trained on the administration of naloxone. Prescription drug monitoring programs would also receive increased support under CARA.

Methadone and Suboxone have become familiar interventions for anyone knowledgeable on opioid addiction issues. Most state-funded opioid treatment programs in the United States are currently full and have waiting lists of addicted people who are eager to participate in medication-assisted treatment.

In America, there has been a notable expansion in recent years of treatment programs who utilize methadone or suboxone to help patients. While many of these programs are private self-pay, Medicaid presently pays for methadone-based treatment approaches in a number of U.S. states. The number of private pay programs currently outnumber state-funded and Medicaid-funded programs by a substantial margin.

Posted in Buprenorphine, Heroin, Methadone, Methadone Clinics, Opiate Treatment, Suboxone, Suboxone Clinics, Suboxone Doctors, Suboxone Physicians, Teen Substance Abuse | Tagged | Comments Off on Heroin and Prescription Drug Epidemic