Category Archives: Opiate Treatment

Acadia HealthCare Opioid Addiction Treatment

acadia-healthcareAcadia Healthcare is a leading behavioral healthcare services provider headquartered out of Franklin, Tennessee. The company was established in 2005 and has experienced rapid growth as a result of strategic acquisitions and a sharp focus on the delivery of psychiatric and chemical dependency treatment services.

Acadia recently bought out CRC Health Group for a reported $1.2 billion in a well-publicized sale which closed in February 2015. The acquisition significantly expanded Acadia’s opioid addiction treatment capabilities adding approximately 82 methadone/suboxone facilities nationwide. The company is nicely positioned to serve tens of thousands of patients on a daily basis who are struggling with opioid addiction and other associated illnesses. Methadone and buprenorphine products are utilized in association with a variety of counseling approaches.

Just added to Methadone.US are five of Acadia’s opioid treatment clinics located in San Diego, Riverside, Baltimore, Portland, and Southern Indiana.

Acadia’s mission statement:

Acadia Healthcare’s mission is to create behavioral health centers where people receive care that enables them to regain hope in a supportive, caring environment.

The company presently has behavioral healthcare facilities in 37 U.S. states, the United Kingdom, and Puerto Rico. These include residential treatment centers, inpatient psychiatric hospitals, outpatient clinics, and therapeutic school-based programs.

Right Path Clinics Offer Suboxone and Addiction Counseling

right-path-clinics-2Right Path is an opioid treatment provider operating in the greater Hampton Roads area of eastern Virginia. The organization specializes in the use of burprenorphine (the critical ingredient in Suboxone that alleviates opioid withdrawal symptoms).

Right Path currently have outpatient services in Virginia Beach, Newport News, and Suffolk, but plan to soon offer a location convenient for residents and visitors along the Outer Banks.

Recognizing the importance of individualized treatment plans, Right Path tailor their services to the needs of the individual patient. While suboxone is beneficial in eliminating the pain of opioid withdrawal, addiction counseling is essential in helping patients to understand the addiction and recovery process. Right Path provide addiction counseling as a component of their overall treatment program.

Evening and weekend hours are offered, and most insurance is accepted. The Right Path website has a helpful page that outlines various questions and issues that you might cover with your Suboxone Doctor in your first appointment. Their website provides another highly informative page on Suboxone which answers many common questions about this increasingly popular medication. More information on Right Path’s locations and contact information can be obtained here:

Maine’s Governor LePage May Undermine Opioid Addiction Treatment

Maine2Paul LePage, the governor of Maine, has announced that he is considering ceasing state-funded support for methadone. As an alternative, Maine is proposing that patients prescribed methadone be switched to a more affordable suboxone option as part of a $727,000 state budget cut. The story is here.

This is an indefensible decision with dire medical implications for opioid addicted patients currently receiving methadone. It equates to government officials making medical decisions that will negatively impact the health and well-being of thousands of people.

Representative Drew Gattine (a member of the Health & Human Services Committee) is quoted as saying the proposal shows a lack of understanding of the societal costs of addiction throughout the state of Maine.

Methadone and suboxone are both effective medications, but offer very unique characteristics and applications depending on the severity & chronicity of a patient’s opioid addiction. Buprenorphine (the actual opioid agonist contained in suboxone) has a much lower ceiling effect than does methadone meaning its effectiveness would be insufficient for a potentially large percentage of stable methadone patients on 60mg or more of methadone daily. Many patients on a moderate to high maintenance dose of methadone would not have their opioid withdrawal symptoms managed by even the maximum dosage allowed for suboxone – which is generally around 32 mg per day.

For a politician to, in essence, prescribe inappropriate medical treatment for a diagnosable medical condition is a huge state liability. The repercussions are alarming. Hopefully, the local medical establishment and other state officials will step in before irreversible damage is done. Methadone works. This cannot be denied.

Methadone has a long, proven track record of medical efficacy and cost effectiveness. Maine, in particular, has suffered in recent years with a severe opioid addiction epidemic. Reducing access to appropriate medical treatment like methadone will likely result in overdose deaths across Maine and an explosion of condemnation for the governor and his office.

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid addiction is not a fad. It is scientifically proven effective and endorsed by multiple state & federal regulatory agencies as well as ASAM.

SMC Recovery Offering Affordable Opportunity in Scottsdale

smc-recovery-2SMC Recovery based in Scottsdale, Arizona opened an outpatient addiction treatment program late last year. SMC provides a Medication-Assisted Program utilizing methadone and an Intensive Outpatient Program. Both treatment modalities are endorsed by SAMHSA as best practices in the field of addiction treatment.

Methadone programs across the USA cover a wide range of prices sometimes as high as $15.00 per day. However, SMC Recovery have implemented one of the most affordable rates in the country at just $55.00 per week. This is an outstanding value for anyone who has been struggling with opiate addiction and it is one of the most competitive rates we have learned of anywhere in the country.

Prospective patients are often unable to get started with outpatient methadone treatment because the cost is just too high for them. SMC Recovery have lowered this barrier considerably. We were informed by their staff that this price will most likely be active over the next year consequently providing numerous Scottsdale area patients an excellent opportunity to see if methadone treatment is beneficial in addressing their addiction problem. SMC’s program offers counseling & support in addition to methadone dosing.

For more information, visit the SMC Recovery website or contact their staff at: 1-480-998-HOPE (4673).

Recovery Is About Positive Change

new-year-recoveryAs we prepare for another new year, there is always this opportunity for welcomed changes and improvements in our lives. New years resolutions are often built around personal goals that people would like to achieve like quitting smoking, losing weight, or beginning a new hobby.

With opioid addiction, the desire for relief is always present. It is amazing what an individual can do when they are truly motivated and committed to a goal. It is true that people enter recovery every single day. What an incredible truth this is!

The big question is what does it take for a person to step onto the path of change and to point themselves in a new direction? The disease of addiction is one that is allowed to continue as a result of becoming stagnant, inactive. As a disease process, drug addition only gets halted when a person makes a decision to do something about it. If a person fails to take any action to change, then addiction will simply progress.

For some people, their first step toward recovery is to just talk to a caring person about their addiction problem and to take a look at some possible options. Commitment and change usually begin with a simple question like “What if … ?” or “What about … ?”

The desire for something better at times leads us to have an open heart or open mind toward something new and unfamiliar. Surprisingly, some addicted people actually fear “recovery”. It represents the unknown. But so many have looked back, after taking that first step, and been incredibly relieved that they finally did take it.

Methadone and buprenorphine (suboxone) have been extremely beneficial for a large number of opioid addicted people. So have inpatient and outpatient rehabs, detox centers, and 12 Step meetings. There are a number of proven paths that have worked for many! If you are currently struggling in addiction, change is possible and recovery is available to you. It will be a worthwhile decision to find help. You will most likely look back very soon and be glad that you made a decision to explore your own path out of addiction.

Welcome to 2015! It’s a new year. It will bring challenges. It will bring rewards. We hope that you will not sit idly by and let the past dictate your future. 2015 may be your year. Take some steps in a new and better direction. Good things can definitely happen.

Family Support of Methadone Treatment

methadone-treatmentWhen patients enter treatment for opioid addiction, their families are usually relieved yet apprehensive. They may have seen previous recovery efforts not be sustained and their loved one return to active substance use. So, families often learn to be cautiously hopeful.

With methadone treatment, there is a new component in the recovery process with the addition of medication assistance. Whether it’s methadone or suboxone, families become curious as to how their loved one will handle this new medication. As most readers know, there is considerable misinformation and misunderstanding about what methadone can accomplish. This leads a patient’s family supports to sometimes have a wary attitude toward methadone or suboxone.

I would like to share two stories that illustrate how family attitudes can shift. The first patient we’ll call Mary to maintain her anonymity. Mary was a local realtor who had developed an opioid dependence. She had been able to conceal her addiction from her parents, but finally reached a point where it became evident that something was seriously wrong. She told her parents that she was entering “treatment” and would be attending counseling. They supported this decision, but were unaware that Mary’s treatment would include opioid replacement therapy.

Mary had one relapse early in treatment, but made the necessary adjustment and remained drug free for the next 12 months. Methadone worked extremely well for her eliminating her opioid withdrawal and erasing her fear of being sick. Through counseling, her coping improved and her perspective on living a full life returned. She blossomed before everyone’s eyes with improved mood and energy, mental focus, and a renewed spirit. She interviewed with several real estate agencies and was hired by a prominent national realty company. Mary was both excited and grateful.

After this first year, she approached our staff and asked for assistance in telling her parents that she was in “methadone” treatment. She was concerned that they may not understand how important a role it had played in her success and she wanted some back-up from professionals who could answer all her parents’ questions. Mary was also considering a switch from methadone to suboxone with the intention of tapering down off suboxone over several months.

Her parents came to the treatment center and met with Mary, myself, and our nurse. Mary reviewed her progress with her mom and dad and then told them that she had been receiving methadone each day as part of her treatment. She explained how it had assisted her and then asked staff to help elaborate. Her parents listened as we discussed how methadone was an approved medication and had been successful for many years in helping opioid addicted people change their lives. Mary’s mother responded saying “We knew something was working for her. We are so grateful she found you. We have no problem with the methadone and we will support Mary with this.” We went on to discuss her thoughts on transitioning to suboxone and how this might be accomplished. Her parents talked that day about the huge change they had seen in their daughter since coming into treatment and how much it meant to them to see her happy again and getting well.

After the meeting, Mary literally beamed with relief that her parents had been understanding and so supportive. Within the next month, she switched to suboxone and began tapering down over the next four months eventually becoming medication free. Methadone and counseling became the roadmap to safety and sobriety for Mary. It also stabilized her to the point that her skills and abilities as a real estate professional could again be used to build a new future for herself by generating significant income.

The next case example is about a woman we’ll call Sarah. Sarah came to our agency seeking methadone treatment after several years of heroin addiction that had recently worsened. Amazingly, she was still working full-time although she was exhausted and emotionally depressed. She began treatment and within three months barely resembled the person that had been admitted to our program. She gained weight. The light returned to her eyes and her smile. Her mental clarity improved dramatically, and both staff and patients remarked how her personality had surfaced. Sarah had been fatigued and depressed for so long that it was as if she was buried inside herself covered by layers of pain, and tired from the battle of fighting her addiction.

We watched her come back to the person she truly was. We discovered that Sarah was actually a human dynamo and a very capable person who had been struggling under the massive weight of a chronic heroin addiction. As she progressed through treatment, she met many milestones of success. In due time, she informed her parents that she had been receiving methadone and explained to them how helpful the medication had been. I had a phone conversation with Sarah’s mom who lived in another part of the state. She explained that she did not know much about methadone, but was very appreciative for what we had done for her daughter. As a great job opportunity had surfaced in the hometown of Sarah’s parents, she relocated to their town and transferred her treatment to a clinic there.

Two months after Sarah moved, we received a huge fruit basket in our office from her parents thanking us for being a support to her and informing us that Sarah was doing beautifully.

These are true stories and examples of methadone’s beneficial role in recovery as well as illustrating that family fear can be replaced by understanding & family support. These examples show a stark contrast between what a person looks and feels like when they first arrive vs. how far one can go once they become stable on methadone and moving forward on the path of recovery.

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