Category Archives: Methadone Clinics

Evzio For Reversal of Opioid Overdose

evzio-naloxoneEvzio is an FDA-approved emergency treatment that counteracts the effects of opioid overdose. It is an “auto-injector” designed to contain a retractable needle and a 0.4 mg dose of naloxone. Naloxone is a powerful opioid antagonist that reverses the effects of overdose with heroin or other opiates. Naloxone has been used throughout the country in the past few years and literally saved hundreds of lives.

evzio-imageKaleo Pharma is the manufacturer of Evzio. The company specializes in innovative solutions for serious and life threatening medical conditions. Kaleo Pharma is based out of Richmond, Virginia, USA.

As has been documented in national media, very potent forms of heroin have become available much of it laced with other opiate derivatives like fentanyl. These combinations have proven lethal in a large number of cases often with younger people being the victims of overdose due to not understanding the extreme potency of the drugs being sold.

Products like Evzio in the hands of family and local emergency response teams can yield life saving interventions within minutes.

When addicted people survive a near fatal overdose, this often acts as a necessary catalyst to enter treatment and to step onto the path of personal recovery. Overdose survivors sometimes reflect on what has happened to them and may realize the pain that their death would have caused their children, friends, and family. The vast majority of overdoses are accidental and are nearly always preventable.

It is important to remember that addiction is an illness and that addicted people can recover, and can go on to live much improved lives when they are ready to change. Evzio will most likely save many people and give them that opportunity to live a life of real recovery.

For more about naloxone

Maine’s Governor LePage May Undermine Opioid Addiction Treatment

Maine2Paul LePage, the governor of Maine, has announced that he is considering ceasing state-funded support for methadone. As an alternative, Maine is proposing that patients prescribed methadone be switched to a more affordable suboxone option as part of a $727,000 state budget cut. The story is here.

This is an indefensible decision with dire medical implications for opioid addicted patients currently receiving methadone. It equates to government officials making medical decisions that will negatively impact the health and well-being of thousands of people.

Representative Drew Gattine (a member of the Health & Human Services Committee) is quoted as saying the proposal shows a lack of understanding of the societal costs of addiction throughout the state of Maine.

Methadone and suboxone are both effective medications, but offer very unique characteristics and applications depending on the severity & chronicity of a patient’s opioid addiction. Buprenorphine (the actual opioid agonist contained in suboxone) has a much lower ceiling effect than does methadone meaning its effectiveness would be insufficient for a potentially large percentage of stable methadone patients on 60mg or more of methadone daily. Many patients on a moderate to high maintenance dose of methadone would not have their opioid withdrawal symptoms managed by even the maximum dosage allowed for suboxone – which is generally around 32 mg per day.

For a politician to, in essence, prescribe inappropriate medical treatment for a diagnosable medical condition is a huge state liability. The repercussions are alarming. Hopefully, the local medical establishment and other state officials will step in before irreversible damage is done. Methadone works. This cannot be denied.

Methadone has a long, proven track record of medical efficacy and cost effectiveness. Maine, in particular, has suffered in recent years with a severe opioid addiction epidemic. Reducing access to appropriate medical treatment like methadone will likely result in overdose deaths across Maine and an explosion of condemnation for the governor and his office.

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid addiction is not a fad. It is scientifically proven effective and endorsed by multiple state & federal regulatory agencies as well as ASAM.

SMC Recovery Offering Affordable Opportunity in Scottsdale

smc-recovery-2SMC Recovery based in Scottsdale, Arizona opened an outpatient addiction treatment program late last year. SMC provides a Medication-Assisted Program utilizing methadone and an Intensive Outpatient Program. Both treatment modalities are endorsed by SAMHSA as best practices in the field of addiction treatment.

Methadone programs across the USA cover a wide range of prices sometimes as high as $15.00 per day. However, SMC Recovery have implemented one of the most affordable rates in the country at just $55.00 per week. This is an outstanding value for anyone who has been struggling with opiate addiction and it is one of the most competitive rates we have learned of anywhere in the country.

Prospective patients are often unable to get started with outpatient methadone treatment because the cost is just too high for them. SMC Recovery have lowered this barrier considerably. We were informed by their staff that this price will most likely be active over the next year consequently providing numerous Scottsdale area patients an excellent opportunity to see if methadone treatment is beneficial in addressing their addiction problem. SMC’s program offers counseling & support in addition to methadone dosing.

For more information, visit the SMC Recovery website or contact their staff at: 1-480-998-HOPE (4673).

Recovery Is About Positive Change

new-year-recoveryAs we prepare for another new year, there is always this opportunity for welcomed changes and improvements in our lives. New years resolutions are often built around personal goals that people would like to achieve like quitting smoking, losing weight, or beginning a new hobby.

With opioid addiction, the desire for relief is always present. It is amazing what an individual can do when they are truly motivated and committed to a goal. It is true that people enter recovery every single day. What an incredible truth this is!

The big question is what does it take for a person to step onto the path of change and to point themselves in a new direction? The disease of addiction is one that is allowed to continue as a result of becoming stagnant, inactive. As a disease process, drug addition only gets halted when a person makes a decision to do something about it. If a person fails to take any action to change, then addiction will simply progress.

For some people, their first step toward recovery is to just talk to a caring person about their addiction problem and to take a look at some possible options. Commitment and change usually begin with a simple question like “What if … ?” or “What about … ?”

The desire for something better at times leads us to have an open heart or open mind toward something new and unfamiliar. Surprisingly, some addicted people actually fear “recovery”. It represents the unknown. But so many have looked back, after taking that first step, and been incredibly relieved that they finally did take it.

Methadone and buprenorphine (suboxone) have been extremely beneficial for a large number of opioid addicted people. So have inpatient and outpatient rehabs, detox centers, and 12 Step meetings. There are a number of proven paths that have worked for many! If you are currently struggling in addiction, change is possible and recovery is available to you. It will be a worthwhile decision to find help. You will most likely look back very soon and be glad that you made a decision to explore your own path out of addiction.

Welcome to 2015! It’s a new year. It will bring challenges. It will bring rewards. We hope that you will not sit idly by and let the past dictate your future. 2015 may be your year. Take some steps in a new and better direction. Good things can definitely happen.

Buprenorphine and Liver Health

methadone-safe-for-liverJana Burson is a North Carolina physician who specializes in the treatment of opioid addiction using medications like buprenorphine and methadone. Dr. Burson is a passionate caregiver and patient advocate with considerable experience in the field of addiction treatment. She maintains an informative blog on the topic of opioid addiction treatment and recently posted her comments and observations on a revealing 2012 study.

The 2012 study by Saxon et al is reported in her blog to have followed more than 700 patients over 24 weeks who were receiving either methadone or buprenorphine (the active ingredient in Suboxone). These patients were checked for specific red flag elevations that would suggest emerging liver damage or liver inflammation. None of the patients receiving methadone or buprenorphine had significant abberations in liver functioning. This led the researchers to conclude that neither medication causes liver damage.

A 2014 follow-up study by Soyka and others (published in the American Journal on Addictions) found the same results in their research of 181 patients on Suboxone (buprenorphine + naloxone).

Studies like these help to dispel misinformation around opioid treatment medications and their safety. Dr. Burson expressed that it was once routine to order liver function tests for patients on buprenorphine therapy, but that this is likely unnecessary given the more recent research validating methadone and buprenorphine’s safety in regard to liver functioning.

There are addiction-related illnesses, like Hepatitis C, that can have highly detrimental effects on the liver. According to Dr. Burson, the Soyka study also showed that buprenorphine was not harmful even in patients diagnosed with Hepatitis C.

Thorough research studies like these are important in further legitimizing the benefits & established safety profile of opioid treatment medications. Having access to safe medications helps hundreds of thousands of people find effective treatment for chronic opioid addiction.

For More On Methadone

Methadone or Suboxone

addiction-is-treatable-2A common question among those seeking help is whether methadone or suboxone is the best choice for opioid replacement therapy. It reminds me of the age old debate … which is better, Ford or Chevy? Methadone has been used in opioid addiction treatment for about 45 years. Suboxone has been available to the public for 12 years. Each of these medications has been shown, through conclusive research, to be highly effective in eliminating opioid withdrawal. Both methadone and suboxone achieve a similar outcome, but with subtle differences. [view our comparison chart]

When opiate withdrawal symptoms are no longer a daily preoccupation and source of anxiety, individuals are free to invest their energy & time in productive, meaningful activities. Avoiding withdrawal sickness is the single greatest driver of continued opioid use, and often pushes an individual to desperate measures to maintain a supply of opiates so that they will not get sick.

People unfamiliar with addiction sometimes believe that an addicted person “just wants to get high”. To the contrary, most people with a chronic opioid addiction are just trying to get by, to get through the day without becoming sick all over again. Opioid withdrawal sickness is an exhausting roller coaster ride that rarely slows down long enough to allow an individual to escape. Their relief from opioid withdrawal sickness is typically short-lived, and they then begin feeling sick all over again. Quite a vicious cycle.

This is why suboxone (buprenorphine) and methadone are so valuable as a medical treatment for opioid addiction. These synthesized opioid replacement medications have a slow onset, long duration of action. This means that they don’t quickly spike to maximum levels in a person’s bloodstream like heroin. They reach maximum benefit several hours after they are taken. They then remain active in a person’s system for more than 24 hours and consequently keep painful withdrawal symptoms away. With no fear of being sick, a person can finally live their life and refocus their time where it needs to be: work, school, family, home, etc.

Methadone is a full opioid agonist whereas buprenorphine (the active ingredient in suboxone) is a partial opioid agonist. Because suboxone is a partial agonist, it is somewhat less susceptible to causing overdose and is considered easier to taper off of as individuals lower their daily dosage. As a result of methadone being a full opioid agonist, it is typically more effective with severe, long-term opioid addictions. Suboxone has a peak benefit at 24-32 mg per day whereby higher dosages than this will not produce additional withdrawal relief. However, methadone has no such “ceiling effect” and much higher dosages can be utilized as needed to eliminate a patient’s opioid withdrawal.